Sexual Cultures in East Asia: The Social Construction of Sexuality and Sexual Risk in a Time of AIDS

By Evelyne Micollier | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8

REPRESENTATIONS OF 'US' AND 'OTHERS' IN THE AIDS NEWS DISCOURSE: A TAIWANESE EXPERIENCE1

MEI-LING HSU, WEN-CHI LIN AND TSUI-SUNG WU


WHY STUDY NEWS MEDIA?

For years, the mass media have been a major conduit through which public perceptions of and attitudes towards AIDS have been formed and influenced. Large-scale media campaigns around the world have played a critical role in instilling intended effects of AIDS awareness and prevention, but the unintended effects of the news coverage about AIDS cannot be overlooked. At a more general level, research has shown that news media are important sources of health information for both private individuals (Freimuth et al. 1984; Simpkins and Brenner 1984; Wallack 1990) and for policy makers (Weiss 1974). Given their predominance in modern society, news media sometimes have a stronger impact on public cognition, attitudes, and preventive behaviour than planned media campaigns do. For the population at large, those who have no direct contact with AIDS or its sufferers, the awareness of the disease is mostly media related. Therefore, it is to these media portrayals that we must turn to, if we are to achieve a better understanding of how and why stigmatization of AIDS-related groups occurs.

In addressing the functions of the mass media, Watney (1987) maintained that the mass media use a mode of address which constructs recipients of the messages as a unified 'general public' with shared values and characteristics. Deviant or marginalized groups are excised and made to stand outside the general public, inevitably assuming the appearance of a threat to its internal cohesion. Newspapers in particular tend to construct an ideal audience of national family units, surrounded by the threatening spectacle of the deviants. In other words, the ideal audience addressed by the newspapers can be seen as the implicit 'us' group in the mainstream society. Those who are considered to threaten the norms or welfare of the ideal audience are thus categorized as 'Others.' An issue worth addressing here is: Who are the members of these 'Us' and 'Other' groups formed in the news discourse? How have they been changed over time?

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sexual Cultures in East Asia: The Social Construction of Sexuality and Sexual Risk in a Time of AIDS
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.