Textual Poachers: Television Fans & Participatory Culture

By Henry Jenkins | Go to book overview

8

"Strangers No More, We Sing": Filk Music, Folk Culture, and the Fan Community
I was with the Midwest crowd
Who stood in line for blocks.
I cheered on the Reliant's end.
I shed a tear for Spock's
And we talked for three days running
Of how Khan did push his luck.
And I am saved!
I am saved!
I am saved!

(Julia Ecklar, "Born Again Trek," 1984a)

Julia Ecklar's passionate song, "Born Again Trek" expresses sentiments shared by many within the fan community upon the release of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. The first generation Trek fans had waited for the better part of two decades for a revival of their favorite media universe, through countless repeats of the original series episodes, through a succession of rumors concerning its possible return either as a network series or as feature films, through a promising yet disappointing animated series, uneven professional novels, and a lackluster first movie. What Ecklar's song captures so vividly, then, is the sense of tremendous relief and jubilation those fans felt when they first saw Star Trek II, a film widely praised by Trekkers and seen upon its release as sparking a revival of interest in the series: "Sixteen years it's been/But now Trek has been born again/I'm proud to be a born again Trek fan."

At once a personal expression of one fan's response to the film and a statement of generally shared sentiments and experiences within fandom, "Born Again Trek" is a rallying cry for the reconstruction of Trek fan culture and for the recruitment of new fans ("Now it's our solemn duty/To see that everyone's been saved").

-250-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Textual Poachers: Television Fans & Participatory Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 343

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.