The Story Performance Handbook

By R. Craig Roney | Go to book overview

8—
Telling Your Own Self-Created Tales

Self-created tales can take a variety of forms but all hold in common the fact that you are the original author. Narratives created by prominent authors fall into this category as well. Some of these authors who are also storytellers in the traditional sense craft their stories in oral form to be told to audiences and simultaneously or subsequently publish them in print form to be enjoyed by audiences via reading. These stories can fall into any of the standard genres of narrative except, of course, for traditional literature where the original authorship is unknown. With traditional literature, however, many professional storytellers spend months researching a particular folk tale and then create their own unique variant of it. In these instances, the author, in truth, is designated as the reteller but the process of creation is quite similar to that followed by the author of an original story.

Another subcategory of the self-created tale is variously named the autobiographical tale, personal narrative, or family story. Here the characters and settings in the story are real people known to the author (including oneself) who are either living or were once alive.

For you as a beginning teller, the beauty of taking the time to create a story from scratch is that the memory work required to learn to tell it is much easier than learning to tell someone else's story. This is so either because the memorizing of the plot structure is completed during the creation of the story or, as in the case of a personal story, the plot, setting, and characters are already well known to you. Moreover, because you have much greater personal investment in this type of tale, it will likely result in a livelier telling on your part than the telling of another's story.

-141-

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The Story Performance Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Credits ix
  • Preface xi
  • Part I - Reading Aloud 1
  • 1 - Introduction to Reading Aloud 3
  • 2 - Reading Aloud Picture Books 6
  • 3 - Reading Aloud Chapter Books 43
  • 4 - Reading Poetry Aloud 69
  • Part II - Transition to Storytelling 77
  • 5 - Sharing Stories Through the Use of Props 79
  • Part III - Storytelling 111
  • 6 - Introduction to Storytelling 113
  • 7 - Stand-Up Storytelling 118
  • 8 - Telling Your Own Self-Created Tales 141
  • Part IV - Developing Story Performance Programs 157
  • 9 - Creating a Story Performance Program 159
  • References 181
  • Author Index 187
  • Subject Index 191
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