Civil War and Reconstruction

By David C. King | Go to book overview

American Heritage®
AMERICAN VOICES

CIVIL WAR AND
RECONSTRUCTION

David C. King

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

-i-

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Civil War and Reconstruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction to the Americanheritage® - American Voices Series vii
  • Introduction to Civil War and Reconstruction ix
  • Part I - North and South Drift Apart 1
  • Slavery: Voices in Opposition 4
  • A Northern Mill Worker's Thoughts 5
  • Nat Turner's Revolt 7
  • The Affair Amistad 10
  • Part II - The Deepening Crisis 13
  • 1850: the Last Compromise 15
  • The Fugitive Slave Act 18
  • The Underground Railroad 21
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe and Uncle Tom's Cabin 25
  • Bleeding Kansas 28
  • The Dred Scott Decision 30
  • The Lincoln-Douglas Debates 31
  • John Brown's Raid on Harpers Ferry 33
  • The Election of 1860: Two Presidents 36
  • Part III - The War Begins 39
  • On the Eve of War 41
  • Fort Sumter: the Opening Shots 42
  • Brother Against Brother, Family Against Family 46
  • The First Battle of Bull Run 47
  • Part IV - Stalemate East and West 53
  • Experiencing War Firsthand 54
  • The First Campaign for Richmond 56
  • The Military Leaders 59
  • Camp Life 67
  • A Civil War Song 69
  • Two Women Spies 70
  • Horace Greeley Versus President Lincoln 74
  • Antietam: the Bloodiest Day 75
  • The Emancipation Proclamation 78
  • African Americans in the War 80
  • Part V - The Turning of the Tide 85
  • The Battle of Fredericksburg 86
  • The Campaign for Vicksburg 89
  • The Battle of Gettysburg 93
  • Pickett's Charge 95
  • The Aftermath: Southern Gloom, Northern Cheers 99
  • The Gettysburg Address 101
  • Hospitals and Medical Care 102
  • Clara Barton: Angel of the Battlefield 104
  • Prison Hell: Escape from Andersonville 106
  • Part VI - The Fall of the Confederacy 109
  • Grant, Sherman, and Total War 110
  • Sherman's Campaign in Georgia 114
  • Surrender at Appomattox 116
  • Part VII - Restoring the Union 121
  • New Rights for African Americans 122
  • Restoring Southern Control in the South 124
  • Sources 127
  • Index 131
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