Skilled Interpersonal Communication: Research, Theory, and Practice

By Owen Hargie; David Dickson | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

Interpersonal communication:A skill-based model

INTRODUCTION

THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS is explicable from within a range of contrasting theoretical frameworks (see Griffin, 2000). What happens when two people meet and initiate a social encounter can be accounted for, as we have seen in Chapter 1, in terms of each behaving skilfully in order to accomplish sought-after goals. Several features of skill in this sense were also outlined in the last chapter. In sum, this type of behaviour may be thought of as an efficient and effective way of achieving warrantable outcomes. Furthermore, behaving in this manner should be in keeping with the rules and conventions governing acceptable conduct in that particular context. A televised advertisement for a digital television company specialising in sport depicts a young man at the end of a panel selection interview. He gets up, goes over to the members and, in turn, ruffles hair and pinches cheeks as he would were he with his football friends. While this form of leave-taking might be perfectly acceptable in that situation, it is an embarrassingly inappropriate way to finish off a rather formal interview. Skilled behaviour must be appropriate to situational expectations.

But what precisely is communication, in any case? The first part of this chapter will be given over to addressing this question. Having done so, it will develop a skill-based, theoretical model of the communicative process which highlights its transactional nature. What takes place when two people interact is presented as being undergirded by a complex of perceptual, cognitive, affective and performative factors operating within a person-situation framework. The activity is held to be energised and given direction by the desire to achieve set goals and

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Skilled Interpersonal Communication: Research, Theory, and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Boxes ix
  • Preface to the Fourth Edition xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction- The Importance of Interpersonal Skills 1
  • Chapter 2 - Interpersonal Communication:A Skill-Based Model 11
  • Chapter 3 - Nonverbal Communication 43
  • Chapter 4 - Rewarding and Reinforcing 81
  • Chapter 5 - Questioning 115
  • Chapter 6 - Reflecting 147
  • Chapter 7 - Listening 169
  • Chapter 8 - Explaining 197
  • Chapter 9 - Self-Disclosure 223
  • Chapter 10 - Set Induction and Closure 259
  • Chapter 1- 1 - Assertiveness 291
  • Chapter 12 - Influence and Persuasion 325
  • Chapter 13 - Negotiating 369
  • Chapter 14 - Groups and Group Interaction 401
  • Chapter 15 - Concluding Comments 439
  • References 443
  • Name Index 509
  • Subject Index 521
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 548

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.