Skilled Interpersonal Communication: Research, Theory, and Practice

By Owen Hargie; David Dickson | Go to book overview

Chapter 8

Explaining

INTRODUCTION

THIS CHAPTER is DEVOTED to the processes involved in giving information in such a way as to maximise comprehension. We will concentrate essentially on the cognitively based task of sharing detail and bringing about understanding. Presentations that rely more on emotion and are intended primarily to persuade (rather than enlighten) through creating changes in attitude or opinion (rather than knowledge) will be dealt with in Chapter 12, in relation to influencing. Without any shadow of doubt, people have more information available to them now than at any other time in history. We live in a world where the onward march of computer-mediated technology in all its forms and guises is an ever-present reality. The Internet is currently its proudest epitome. Yet being able to access a welter of undigested facts, theories and findings does not automatically make us more enlightened.

Referring to communication within organisations, Clampitt (2001) made a valid distinction between data, information and knowledge. While recognising difficulties in providing tight definitions of each, data are said to concern particular representations of reality, not all of which may be accurate or relevant to that person at that time. Information is created when certain elements are focused on, isolated from background data, and their potential contribution to decision-making realised. Finally, knowledge relies on recognizing patterns and consistencies in information, making possible the development of theories that can be tested. It is only such knowledge that produces effective action. There is, therefore, a need to give thought to the organisation of material, how it is delivered and to whom, if we are to benefit from what we read and hear, as well as successfully getting our own message across.

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Skilled Interpersonal Communication: Research, Theory, and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Boxes ix
  • Preface to the Fourth Edition xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction- The Importance of Interpersonal Skills 1
  • Chapter 2 - Interpersonal Communication:A Skill-Based Model 11
  • Chapter 3 - Nonverbal Communication 43
  • Chapter 4 - Rewarding and Reinforcing 81
  • Chapter 5 - Questioning 115
  • Chapter 6 - Reflecting 147
  • Chapter 7 - Listening 169
  • Chapter 8 - Explaining 197
  • Chapter 9 - Self-Disclosure 223
  • Chapter 10 - Set Induction and Closure 259
  • Chapter 1- 1 - Assertiveness 291
  • Chapter 12 - Influence and Persuasion 325
  • Chapter 13 - Negotiating 369
  • Chapter 14 - Groups and Group Interaction 401
  • Chapter 15 - Concluding Comments 439
  • References 443
  • Name Index 509
  • Subject Index 521
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 548

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.