A Special Scar: The Experiences of People Bereaved by Suicide

By Alison Wertheimer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank the following: the King Edward's Hospital Fund for London who provided financial support to meet the interviewing costs, and the Nuffield Foundation whose grant financed the transcription of the interview tapes; my agent, Gloria Ferris, for her encouragement in the early stages of this project; Gill Davies and Edwina Welham of Routledge; CRUSE, The Compassionate Friends and the Editor of New Society for putting me in touch with people willing to talk about their experiences as suicide survivors; Douglas Chambers, Phil Clements, Libby Insall, Colin Murray Parkes, Barbara Porter and Susan Wallbank for their advice on particular issues; and John Costello who helped me stay on the journey.

A legacy from my father, who died while I was researching this book, enabled me to take time off from other work and write this book without interruption. For that I wish to thank him.

Above all, I owe an enormous debt of gratitude to the survivors who shared their stories with me. I am grateful for their openness, their willingness to share thoughts and feelings which were often painful and difficult to talk about.

I would also like to thank the following for their help with this new edition. The counsellors and group leaders whose ideas and experiences were invaluable in preparing the new chapters; they are too numerous to name, but I hope that they will recognise their contributions. My clients who, in very different ways, have taught me so much over the years. And lastly, my editor, Kate Hawes, for her patience when I begged for yet another postponed deadline.

Acknowledgement is due to the following for permission to quote from 'The Guide' by U.A. Fanthorpe: Peterloo Poets (Standing To 1982) and King Penguin (Selected Poems 1986).

-xvii-

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A Special Scar: The Experiences of People Bereaved by Suicide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface to the Second Edition xiv
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • Part 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Suicide: an Introduction 3
  • Chapter 2 - Survivors of Suicide 17
  • Part 2 - Aspects of Suicide Bereavement 33
  • Chapter 3 - Meeting the Survivors 35
  • Chapter 4 - When the Suicide Happens 39
  • Chapter 5 - Looking Back 53
  • Chapter 6 - Why Did It Happen? the Search for Understanding 66
  • Chapter 7 - The Inquest 79
  • Chapter 8 - Funerals 90
  • Chapter 9 - Facing Suicide as a Family 95
  • Chapter 10 - The Impact of Suicide on Individual Family Members 108
  • Chapter 11 - Facing the World 124
  • Chapter 12 - Looking for Support 136
  • Chapter 13 - Facing the Feelings 149
  • Chapter 14 - Finding a Way Through 166
  • Part 3 - Responding to People Bereaved by Suicide 179
  • Chapter 15 - Meeting the Needs of Survivors 181
  • Chapter 16 - Groups for People Bereaved by Suicide 196
  • Chapter 17 - Counselling People Bereaved by Suicide 215
  • Postscript 237
  • Appendix 1 239
  • Appendix 2 244
  • References 247
  • Name Index 257
  • Subject Index 261
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