Sustainable Development and Learning: Framing the Issues

By Neil Chalmers; William Scott et al. | Go to book overview

Foreword

Few issues are so important but so elusive as sustainable development and there can be very few such issues indeed where the role of learning is so crucially important to our future. To many people, sustainable development is a difficult and nebulous concept and yet its main themes are fundamental to the daily lives of everybody on our planet. People from all walks of life, whether they be politicians, business leaders, journalists, educators, working people, students, parents or people in retirement, readily appreciate and often have strong views about the main components of sustainable development. How we generate enough wealth to enjoy a good quality of life; how we organise our society so that this quality of life is available to all; how we do so in a way that protects our wonderfully rich but fragile natural world are all things that to greater or lesser degrees are understood to be important. But learning about sustainable development is more than learning about economic development, about social policy or environmental protection. It is a question of learning about how these three fundamental areas are intimately related. It is a question of learning about the perspective of time.

There are hard issues to tackle. The resources of our natural world help us to create the wealth that, if wisely used, will enable people to enjoy a good standard of living. Yet we must not use such resources in a way that compromises the ability of future generations to create good standards of living for themselves in turn. In particular, we must not allow our pursuit of wealth generation in the short term to mutilate or destroy our natural environment, for not only can this undermine the important cultural and aesthetic contribution that the environment makes to our lives, but can imperil the very survival of countless people.

Sustainable development presents a complex and challenging learning agenda and raises many questions. What skills are needed to learn effectively across all of the many components of sustainable development? How can learning experiences best be designed for all of the many stakeholders for whom such learning is, or should be, essential? How does one create learning programmes suited respectively to governments, to the world of work, to the formal education sector and to lifelong learners? How do we measure the effectiveness of different vehicles for learning about sustainable development? And how do we measure the effectiveness, or otherwise, of the outcomes in the field of sustainable development itself?

It is this crucial interface between sustainable development and learning that is

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sustainable Development and Learning: Framing the Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Authors' Introduction xiii
  • 1 - Framing the Issues 1
  • 2 - The Policy Context 12
  • 3 - Language and Meaning 23
  • 4 - Learning and Sustainable Development 31
  • 5 - Humans and Nature 44
  • 6 - Theory and Practice 56
  • 7 - Management of Learning 66
  • 8 - Curriculum and Pedagogy 78
  • 9 - Measuring Learning 87
  • 10 - Monitoring and Evaluation 97
  • 11 - Building Capacity, Developing Agency 110
  • 12 - Economic Behaviour 120
  • 13 - Globalisation and Fragmentation 133
  • 14 - What Happens Next? 143
  • References 148
  • Index 161
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 173

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.