Social Justice, Education, and Identity

By Carol Vincent | Go to book overview

Introduction
Carol VincentThis book is a collection of writings on the theme of social justice, education and identity by researchers who are members of the British Educational Research Association's (BERA) Special Interest Group (SIG) in Social Justice. The authors seek to theorise the concept of social justice, inquire into its presence or absence in various sites and explore how the education system, through its organisation and practices, is implicated in the realisation of just or unjust social outcomes (Dehli 2002, personal communication). A particular theme is how the identities of individuals and groups are formed and transformed in schools, colleges and universities.These are the kind of concerns that have sustained the SIG since its inception. I convened the group-a loose network of researchers and practitioners with a theoretical and practical interest in social justice-in 1997. The impetus, a very sad one, was the untimely death of Professor Barry Troyna from cancer the previous year. Barry had written extensively on race and education, and also on methodology. Questions of social justice were always to the fore in his work, and we hoped that the SIG would provide a forum in which to carry forward the issues which were of concern to him. The original rationale for the SIG set out the following aims:
• To focus on the changing nature of the relationship between social justice and education in the light of the recent restructuring of the education system.
• To focus on the concept of social justice itself, and to ask with Harvey (1993) 'which theory of social justice is the most socially just'. What are the definitions of social justice which are useful to apply to a study of education?
• To consider the processes by which academic critique can or should influence political agendas.

The title of this book, the linking of social justice and identity, may need some explanation. Social justice has traditionally been discussed in economic terms. However, distributive justice, as it is often referred to, overlooks the cultural and relational aspects of social justice. In the 1970s and early 1980s, in the study of education and other social science disciplines, class-based analyses occupied a

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Justice, Education, and Identity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 227

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.