Is Anyone Listening? Accountability and Women Survivors of Domestic Violence

By Gill Hague; Rosemary Aris et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 3

The obstacles to empowerment

What kind of power for women?

Following on from the argument we developed in the last chapter, we are not so naive as to assume that gaining a voice as a user group would leave abused women wholly better off. User participation has been widely critiqued as open to tokenism, co-option and exploitation. There needs to be a clear understanding of the dangers and limitations, and of action that can be taken to combat these, if women are to obtain full benefit from a new level of involvement. Indeed, our own research study (reported in later chapters) sought to distinguish between the mere semblance of involvement, on the one hand, and survivors of domestic violence exerting actual influence and decision-making power, on the other.

The problems with both the theory and practice of empowerment through user participation are well-documented (Croft and Beresford, 1996; Humphries, 1996; Ramcharan et al., 1997). They revolve around issues such as competing ideals, professional vested interests and the demands of funders. In this chapter, we explore a range of barriers to empowerment, grouped under considerations of conflicting models, managerial and professional agendas, practical obstacles and contested understandings of power. All of these may prevent abused women, as well as other groups of service users, from having a full say in the policies and services they need to help them survive. In the chapters that follow, based on our research with women survivors of domestic abuse, we will see some of these obstacles operating in practice, as well as a number of effective ways round them, and we will conclude with some useful advice to those who want to be part of abused women gaining a real voice in refuge, multi-agency and statutory responses to men's violence.


Conflicting models: two approaches to empowerment

We saw in the last chapter how there can be a tension, even within the aims of user movements themselves, between concrete change and a broader philosophy of consciousness-raising and empowerment. At the

-26-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Is Anyone Listening? Accountability and Women Survivors of Domestic Violence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 180

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.