Coping with Globalization

By Aseem Prakash; Jeffrey A. Hart | Go to book overview

Preface

This volume is the second in a series of three that examines the impact of economic globalization on governance institutions across countries and issues areas. We have been interested in understanding the changing nature of international political economy of which economic globalization is both a cause and a consequence. We began preliminary discussions on this subject in the Spring of 1995 focusing on four key questions: is economic globalization a fad, how best to conceptualize it, how did it originate, and what may be its implications? Subsequently, we added a fifth question: how to cope with globalization?

To systematically examine these questions, we organized two joint panels, "Governance Structures for the Twenty-First Century," at the San Diego convention of the International Studies Association, April 16-20, 1996, a workshop in Indianapolis, Indiana, October 12-13, and another workshop in Alexandria, Virginia, July 31-August 1, 1998. Three edited volumes have emerged from these deliberations: the first volume, Globalization and Governance, from the San Diego conference and the Indianapolis workshop; the second and the third volumes, Coping with Globalization and Responding to Globalization, from the Alexandria workshop. These volume are multi-disciplinary, with the authors representing the disciplines of political science, economics, law, international business, and business strategy.

Globalization and Governance focuses on how economic globalization impacts the extant governance institutions at multiple levels. Coping with Globalization seeks to understand how actors, both governments and firms, can cope with globalization across issue areas. The premise is that since globalization creates "winners" and "losers," there is a need to cope with it. Responding to Globalization examines how different countries have responded to the challenges of the increasing levels of global economic integration.

Many books on globalization recommend either resisting it or embracing it. Coping with Globalization does neither. Not being an advocacy piece, it focuses on conceptual issues germane to thinking about coping strategies of both firms and governments. We start from the assumption that globalization processes are restructuring policy spaces, thereby creating

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Coping with Globalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures viii
  • Preface xi
  • Coping with Globalization - An Introduction 1
  • Part I 27
  • 1 - A Race to the Bottom or Governance from the Top? 31
  • 2 - Convergence and Sovereignty 52
  • 3 - Environmental Regulations and the Global Strategies of Multinational Enterprises 77
  • 4 - Globalization and Federalism 94
  • Part II 115
  • 5 - Technonationalism and Cooperation in a Globalizing Industry 117
  • 6 - Dialing for Dollars 148
  • Part III 171
  • 7 - Marketing Money 173
  • 8 - Does Globalization Sap the Fiscal Power of the State? 198
  • Coping with Globalization - A Conclusion 225
  • Index 239
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