Banking on Knowledge: The Genesis of the Global Development Network

By Diane Stone | Go to book overview

1

The genesis of the GDN

Erik Johnson and Diane Stone

In December 1999, the Global Development Network (GDN)-an association of research institutes and think tanks-was launched by the World Bank in cooperation with the United Nations, the governments of Japan, Germany and Switzerland, a group of regional research networks, and a number of other international development institutions. This initiative is designed to enhance the quality and availability of policy-oriented research, strengthen the institutions that undertake this work and offer networking opportunities in order to address better the causes and possible solutions to poverty and meet the challenges of development. The GDN seeks to support the work of think tanks, research institutes and development researchers by providing better information about and access to resources such as research funds and professional development programmes. It also helps to coordinate and disseminate research efforts and build capacity for institutes and individuals in developing countries. Another important role of the GDN is the multi-disciplinary concern to forge political, sociological, economic, anthropological and other research to inform policy making at a national level as well as in international organisations.

The GDN has a longer history than that marked by the first GDN conference in 1999-GDN99. It was pre-dated by a number of regional meetings of think tanks, consultative discussions and initiatives designed to generate new research. Accordingly, the first section of this introductory chapter outlines the gestation of the network prior to GDN99, while the second section focuses on the planning and activities surrounding the GDN99 conference in Bonn, Germany. The final section addresses issues surrounding the future development of the GDN. The chapters that follow were first prepared for the inaugural meeting of the GDN. Therefore, they represent much of the conceptual underpinning of the initiative and the first in-depth examination of the core issues and debates it seeks to address.

The World Bank has not been alone in initiating dialogues with research institutes and think tanks. A number of international organisations have engaged with institutes for years, albeit on a less systematic basis than that represented by the GDN. Nevertheless, the GDN represents a valuable study of a number of developments. First, it provides insight into the changing emphases within the World Bank as it seeks ways to implement the principles behind its

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Banking on Knowledge: The Genesis of the Global Development Network
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.