Audit Cultures: Anthropological Studies in Accountability, Ethics, and the Academy

By Marilyn Strathern | Go to book overview

Afterword Accountability… and ethnography

Marilyn Strathern

While the principal focus of these essays remains with anthropologists, or ethnologists as Chapter 7 would have it, they raise issues which concern academics at large, and especially academics in the social sciences whose subject is enquiry into the nature of social and cultural life. What is the social scientist's, or anthropologist's, task but to describe society, social organization, culture? For anthropologists the means to this end include the practice of writing ethnography, and its twin, the kind of (field) research which anticipates that holistic enterprise. Indeed, ethnography is at once claimed as anthropology's chief medium for conceptualizing the task of description and has wide popularity as a method of empirical enquiry which these days is pursued across a range of disciplines within-and sometimes beyond-the social sciences. Clearly, however, this has not been a book 'about' ethnography, even though ethnography is a background presence in many of these contributions; so why my addendum?

On the face of it, pursuing the kind of ethnography which relies on open-ended immersement in diverse social situations seems far removed from many of the professional concerns of academic production. In the context of higher education, the rituals of verification associated with audit might bear a resemblance to the scholarly apparatus which is the focus of its scrutiny, but their concern with quality is not carried into the content and analytical rigour of an academic product. Rather their concern is with the 'external' mechanisms by which such products are valued-the reputation of researchers through the journals in which they publish or the success of teaching as it has an impact on students. Here audit patently impinges upon conditions of work and academic career trajectories. By the same token, it is seemingly far

-279-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Audit Cultures: Anthropological Studies in Accountability, Ethics, and the Academy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.