Fifty Major Thinkers on Education: From Confucius to Dewey

By Joy A. Palmer; Liora Bresler et al. | Go to book overview

Books on Aristotle's educational ideas

b
Bauman, R.W., Aristotle's Logic of Education (New Perspectives In Philosophical Scholarship: Texts And Issues), Vol. 19, New York: Peter Lang, 1998.

h
Howie, G. (ed.), Aristotle on Education, London: Collier-Macmillan, 1968.

l
Lord, C., Education and Culture in the Political Thought of Aristotle, Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1982.

v
Verbeke, G., Moral Education in Aristotle, Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press, 1990.

Books with chapters on Aristotle's educational ideas

f
Frankena, W.K., Three Historical Philosophies of Education, Glenview, Illinois: Scott Foresman, 1965.

r
Rorty, A.O. (ed.), Philosophers on Education, London: Routledge, 1998.

PETER HOBSON


JESUS OF NAZARETH 4 BCE-AD 29

While he [Jesus] was saying this, a woman in the crowd raised her voice and said to him, 'Blessed is the womb that bore you and the breasts that nursed you!' But he said, 'Blessed rather are those who hear the word of God and obey it!' 1

Jesus of Nazareth as a teacher, preacher and reformer turned history inside out. Jesus taught as he lived. He lived in unconventional ways. His method and his message were the warp and woof of an unconventional mission-to challenge people to think in new ways.

Jesus was born in Palestine near the end of the reign of Herod the Great, probably around 4 BC. His parents were named Mary and Joseph and his family tree went back to King David who lived about 1000-961 BC. Jesus' home town of Nazareth was a town in southern Galilee, about a hundred miles north of Jerusalem and a few miles from Sepphoris, the largest city in Galilee. Palestine had been annexed to the Roman Empire since 63 BC and was ruled by kings appointed by Rome.

We know very little about his early years, but mainstream scholars think that Jesus learned to read and write in a local synagogue, with the Torah as his text. He had several brothers and sisters and his father was a woodworker who probably died before Jesus' public ministry began. As the oldest son, he presumably learned his father's trade making products such as yokes, ploughs, door frames, furniture and cabinets. Woodworkers were considered at the lower end of the peasant class since they didn't own land. 2

One story told about Jesus at 12 years of age points to his interest in religion and portrays him as having a keen mind. Jesus and his family travel with others from Nazareth to the yearly celebration of Passover in Jerusalem. At the end of the festival, the family sets off to return to Nazareth and, after going a day, they realize that Jesus isn't with the caravan. Mary and Joseph return to Jerusalem, frantically searching for him.

-20-

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Fifty Major Thinkers on Education: From Confucius to Dewey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Chronological List of Contents v
  • Alphabetical List of Contents viii
  • Preface xiii
  • Confucius 551-479 Bce 1
  • Further Reading 5
  • Notes 9
  • Books on Aristotle''s Educational Ideas 20
  • Saint Augustine 354-430 25
  • John Wesley 1703-91 50
  • Kant''s Major Writings 64
  • Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel 1770-1831 84
  • John Henry Newman 1801-90 100
  • Herbert Spencer 1820-1903 120
  • Thomas Henry Huxley 1825-95 128
  • Further Reading 146
  • Alfred Binet 1857-1911 160
  • Émile Durkheim 1858-1917 165
  • Addams'' Major Writings 187
  • Notes 191
  • Harvard (1924-39) 205
  • Émile Jaques-Dalcroze 1865-1950 206
  • Martin Buber 1878-1965 239
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