Fifty Major Thinkers on Education: From Confucius to Dewey

By Joy A. Palmer; Liora Bresler et al. | Go to book overview

Kant's major writings

The standard critical edition of Kant's works is Kants gesammelte Schriften, ed. Deutsche Akademie der Wissenschaften, 29 vols, Berlin, de Gruyter, 1902-83. Recommended English translations of his major works are as follows.

Critique of Pure Reason, trans. P. Guyer and A.W. Wood, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Practical Philosophy, trans. M.J. Gregor, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.
Critique of the Power of Judgment, trans. P. Guyer, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
Lectures on Ethics, trans. J.B. Schneewind and P. Heath, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Political Writings, ed. H. Reiss, trans. H.B. Nisbet, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2nd edn, 1991.

Further reading

b
Beck, L.W. 'Kant on Education' in his Essays on Kant and Hume, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, pp. 188-204, 1978.

c
Crittenden, P. Learning to be Moral: Philosophical Thoughts About Moral Development, Atlantic Highlands and London: Humanities Press International, chapter 7, 1990.

f
Frankena, W.K. Three Historical Philosophies of Education: Aristotle, Kant, Dewey, Scott, Foreman and Co., Glenview, chapter 3, 1965.

h
Herman, B. 'Training to Autonomy: Kant and the Question of Moral Education', in A.O. Rorty (ed.), Philosophers on Education: New Historical Perspectives, London and New York: Routledge, pp. 255-72, 1998.

ADAM B.DICKERSON


JOHANN HEINRICH PESTALOZZI 1746-1827

It is Life that forms and educates. (Das Leben bildet.)1

Pestalozzi's educational thinking arose from the republican ideology discussed intensively in the second half of the eighteenth century in Switzerland. Influenced by the historian and literary critic Johann Jacob Bodmer, the republican discussion in Pestalozzi's home town of Zurich became radical and emerged as a reform movement in which he was politically socialized during the 1760s. The ideal the young republicans stood for was a paternalistic, virtuous and aristocratic republic, where education would be integral to political understanding. Pestalozzi's political involvement, and the fact that his family did not belong to the upper class (his father died when he was 5), made it impossible for him to pursue a career either as a clergyman or a politician. In keeping with the anti-commercial republican ideology and the shining example of Rousseau's Émile (1762), he decided to become a farmer-dreaming of a virtuous life far away from the perceived vices and corruption of a trading city like Zurich.

In 1767 he went to Berne to begin an apprenticeship in modern farming.

-64-

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Fifty Major Thinkers on Education: From Confucius to Dewey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Chronological List of Contents v
  • Alphabetical List of Contents viii
  • Preface xiii
  • Confucius 551-479 Bce 1
  • Further Reading 5
  • Notes 9
  • Books on Aristotle''s Educational Ideas 20
  • Saint Augustine 354-430 25
  • John Wesley 1703-91 50
  • Kant''s Major Writings 64
  • Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel 1770-1831 84
  • John Henry Newman 1801-90 100
  • Herbert Spencer 1820-1903 120
  • Thomas Henry Huxley 1825-95 128
  • Further Reading 146
  • Alfred Binet 1857-1911 160
  • Émile Durkheim 1858-1917 165
  • Addams'' Major Writings 187
  • Notes 191
  • Harvard (1924-39) 205
  • Émile Jaques-Dalcroze 1865-1950 206
  • Martin Buber 1878-1965 239
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