Geopolitics: Re-Visioning World Politics

By John Agnew | Go to book overview

Geopolitics

The term 'geopolitics' came into use at the end of the nineteenth century. Thinking globally was then formally connected by geopolitical reason to acting globally, but the actual practices of geopolitics began much earlier, when Europeans first encountered the rest of the world.

Geopolitics identifies and scrutinizes the central features of geopolitics from the sixteenth century to the present, paying close attention to its persisting conceptual underpinnings, novel turns and shifting impacts. The book focuses on four key concepts of the modern geographical imagination: visualizing the world as a whole; the definition of geographical areas as advanced or primitive; the notion of the state being the highest form of political organization; and the pursuit of primacy by competing states. The second edition is thoroughly revised to take into account recent world events and what they augur for the future of the modern geopolitical imagination, including the possibility that understanding of the geography of world politics-and a new world politics-can be rebuilt on alternative grounds.

Exemplified by topical issues such as the US 'war on terrorism', the rise of China as a Great Power, the break-up of the former Yugoslavia, US President G. W. Bush's identification of a global 'axis of evil', and the re-emergence of Central Europe as a critical geopolitical region, the book shows how questions of the organization of power combine with those of geographical definition and highlights the crucial geopolitical certainties from as recently as fifteen years ago which have now either disappeared or are in question. Geopolitics provides an invaluable introduction to current critical debates over geopolitics and world politics.

John Agnew is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles.

-i-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Geopolitics: Re-Visioning World Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Visualizing Global Space 15
  • 3 - Turning Time into Space 35
  • 4 - A World of Territorial States 51
  • 5 - Pursuing Primacy 67
  • 6 - The Three Ages of Geopolitics 85
  • 7 - A New Age of 'Global' Geopolitics? 115
  • 8 - Conclusion 127
  • Glossary 135
  • Bibliography 139
  • Index 147
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.