Transnational Organised Crime: Perspectives on Global Security

By Adam Edwards; Peter Gill | Go to book overview

7

Transnational organised crime

A police perspective

Peter Stelfox

This chapter explores the nature of the response made by the police in England and Wales 1 to transnational organised crime. In doing so it focuses on policing activity in this area rather than formal police structures or the legal provisions which support transnational policing. The justification for this approach is that these formal organisational and legal structures do not in themselves adequately reveal the nature of the strategies that the police use. Policing is defined not by how the police are organised or by what they could or should do but rather by their actions, or as Manning (2000:182) has put it: 'Without analysis of dynamic policing transactions, one is left with stark formalism and typologies with are intellectually impoverished.'

The strategic response made by the police service to transnational organised crime has not been explicit but has been embedded in two wider strategic developments; the transnationalisation of policing, much of which has occurred independently of any development which specifically relates to organised crime, and developments in the policing of organised crime, many of which have been unconnected to any transnational dimension it may have.

The transnationalisation of policing predates present concerns about organised crime and has been directed as much towards the wider social role of the police as it has towards a strictly law enforcement agenda (Sheptycki, 1998:492). This has led to the establishment of a multitude of formal transnational policing organisations, from those concerned with the management of policing, such as the International Association of Chiefs of Police, those with an explicit law enforcement function, such as Europol and Interpol, to those with exclusively fraternal aims, such as the International Police Association. Underlying these formal organisations is an extensive network of informal contacts which have been built up as a result of joint operations, training courses, seminars and peace-keeping missions. While policing may not be the most exclusive club in the world, it is arguably one of the largest.

The nature of organised crime in the UK, and the most appropriate means of policing it, is as much a contested area amongst police officers as

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Transnational Organised Crime: Perspectives on Global Security
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures x
  • Tables xi
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Introduction 1
  • References 6
  • Part I - Origins of the Concept 7
  • References 11
  • 1 - Transnational Organised Crime 13
  • 2 - Europe's Response to Transnational Organised Crime 28
  • Notes 39
  • References 40
  • 3 - Global Law Enforcement as a Protection Racket 42
  • Note 55
  • References 56
  • Part II - Measurements and Interpretations 59
  • References 64
  • 4 - Measuring Transnational Organised Crime 65
  • Note 77
  • 5 - Classify, Report and Measure 78
  • References 95
  • 6 - The Network Paradigm Applied to Criminal Organisations 97
  • References 113
  • 7 - Transnational Organised Crime 114
  • Notes 125
  • Part III - Case Studies 127
  • 8 - Bad Boys in the Baltics 131
  • Notes 141
  • 9 - Controlling Drug Trafficking in Central Europe 143
  • Note 154
  • 10 - Recognising Organised Crime's Victims 157
  • Notes 171
  • Part IV - Current and Prospective Responses 175
  • References 181
  • 11 - The Legal Regulation of Transnational Organised Crime 183
  • References 193
  • 12 - Countering the Chameleon Threat of Dirty Money 195
  • Notes 209
  • 13 - Criminal Asset-Stripping 212
  • 14 - Proteiform Criminalities 227
  • Notes 239
  • References 240
  • 15 - Organised Crime and the Conjunction of Criminal Opportunity Framework 241
  • References 262
  • 16 - After Transnational Organised Crime? 264
  • Note 279
  • Index 282
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