The Rise of Political Economy in the Scottish Enlightenment

By Tatsuya Sakamoto; Hideo Tanaka | Go to book overview

2

Policy debate on economic development in Scotland: the 1720s to the 1730s

Gentaro Seki

In 1707 Scotland became united with England, and this was motivated mainly by the idea that the parliamentary Union would promote its economic development (Whatley 1994; Whyte 1995:296-97; Whyte 1997:157-59). 1 In fact, the Treaty of the Union proves that England made economic and financial concessions to Scotland in exchange for political advantages that such a union would provide (Whatley 2000:50-51). But after a few decades, it was increasingly clear that the new Union had fallen short of Scottish expectations of being able to develop Scotland's economy with the assistance of the Union regime. On the contrary, as shown in the Jacobite expedition in 1708, the Jacobite Rebellions of 1715, the Malt Tax Riots in 1725, the Porteous Riots in 1736 and so on, the Union regime can be argued not to have worked particularly well (Devine 1999:17-24). In reality the economic effects of the Union were hardly able to manifest themselves in the eyes of the Scottish people.

In the meantime, the Scottish political class devoted their efforts to economic progress: they founded the Society of Improvers in the Knowledge of Agriculture in Scotland in 1723 and the Board of Trustees for Fisheries and Manufacture in Scotland in 1727. However, as historical evidence shows, no substantial economic development took place until the middle decades of the eighteenth century (for example see Devine 1999:58; Whyte 1995:299-300; Whyte 1997:160-65). Nevertheless, we should not underrate the importance of the 1720s and 1730s, during which there arose among Scottish writers a debate as to what policies the Board of Trustees should propose and implement, and on what grounds. 2 In particular, the writers had to face the fact that the economic agents of Scotland had not yet acquired the ethics and ethos of a market economy, despite the Union regime. In order to develop the Scottish economy, it seemed to be essential to solve this problem because it was supposedly the Scottish people themselves who could turn the possibility of economic growth triggered by the Union into a substantial reality (Whyte 1995:300, and an earlier work, Campbell 1974). In this sense a shaping of adequate economic agents could have meant that the Scottish economy changed in terms of quality during this period.

This chapter will review the policy debate from the 1720s to the 1730s in Scotland, focusing on how the debaters dealt with this problem and how they

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise of Political Economy in the Scottish Enlightenment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 216

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.