The President's Man: Leo Crowley and Franklin Roosevelt in Peace and War

By Stuart L. Weiss | Go to book overview
Save to active project

11
Global Diplomat

O n September 25, 1943, Leo Crowley reached what would be the pinnacle of his public career. For almost a decade he had worked effectively but on the periphery of the Roosevelt administration. Now foreign economic administrator, he would be a major player, a member of the president's cabinet. British representatives found him worth reporting on to their home offices. And newspaper features reflected his new status. Previously they had focused on his personal habits; now they stressed the lights shining nightly in his National Press Building office, his search for more space in an already overburdened Capital, and the potential he brought to the complexities of his new task.

Early commentaries, as in Time, glowed over his appointment. Crowley had a superb reputation as a savvy politician and administrator. He was, one commentator wrote, the president's "manager par excellence." He would reorganize American agencies operating in the economic field abroad and coordinate their work with State Department policy. Supposedly Crowley's new task was temporary -- organizational: when the president's # 1 pinch hitter completed it, he could return to the bench.1

This last was not the president's intent. True, by mid-fall Crowley had devised a flow chart for the Foreign Economic Administration. It appeared, in brief, in the New York Times, November 7, 1943, at the end of John McCormac feature article, Diplomat of Global Economics. Crowley was proposing a complete reorganization of the agencies he controlled and those still technically, and probably effectively, run by Jesse Jones. OEW and OLLA would cease to exist. A geographically organized bureau of areas would be responsible for distribution abroad, and a bureau of supplies for purchases at home and abroad, and the directors of both would report to Crowley. So would various other

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The President's Man: Leo Crowley and Franklin Roosevelt in Peace and War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 295

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?