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THE LIFE OF JACQUES LECOQ

A theatre school should not always journey in the wake of existing theatre forms. On the contrary, it should have a visionary aspect, developing new languages of the stage and thus assisting in the renewal of theatre itself.

(Lecoq 2000:162)


JACQUES LECOQ (1921-99)

When Jacques Lecoq died in 1999, world theatre lost one of its most imaginative, influential and pioneering thinkers and teachers. Compared to many of the figures featured in this series, little has yet been written about Jacques Lecoq. While this can be partly explained by that phenomenon common to many great artistic and cultural innovators of not being fully recognised until after their death, it is also because Lecoq is celebrated almost exclusively as a teacher and thinker, rather than for plays he might have written or for the productions he directed and choreographed.

Jacques Lecoq's real influence lies embodied within thousands of performers, writers, movement choreographers and theatre directors across the world who were once his students in Paris - and elsewhere - during a period of forty-two years. To a greater or lesser extent, his signature rests inscribed in the theatre these 'students' have constructed, in the performances they have made and in the plays they have written

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Jacques Lecoq
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - The Life of Jacques Lecoq 1
  • 2 - The Texts of Jacques Lecoq 43
  • 3 - Traces of Jacques Lecoq 95
  • 4 - Practical Exercises 127
  • 5 - Conclusion 153
  • Name Glossary 161
  • Bibliography 169
  • Index 177
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