3

TRACES OF JACQUES LECOQ

Théâtre de Complicité's Street of Crocodiles and the work of Mummenschanz

For most of the titles that figure in the Performance Practitioners series, this chapter will focus on one production directed by the theatre practitioner in question. Although Lecoq certainly directed professionally when working in Italy between 1948 and 1956, and did so again sporadically in Europe for television, film and the stage up until the 1980s, there is little documented evidence from which to study such work. More importantly, however, it would seem strange to focus on Lecoq as director when the overwhelming thrust of this account has been to consider his contribution to world theatre as teacher and theorist of actor training.

Here, I direct my attention towards tracing Lecoq's influence through the work of two very different companies, most of whose founder members trained at his Paris school. As Franc Chamberlain explains in Jacques Lecoq and the British Theatre, detecting his influence upon the theatre of Britain, or indeed any country, is a difficult and risk-laden task. Chamberlain observes:

There is no ensemble with whom Lecoq is uniquely associated, no performer who is the Lecoq disciple par excellence. Lecoq offers a method of working, what the students do with it is up to them. He does not direct them. He does not tell them what to say…Lecoq's work cannot be 'diluted'

-95-

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Jacques Lecoq
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - The Life of Jacques Lecoq 1
  • 2 - The Texts of Jacques Lecoq 43
  • 3 - Traces of Jacques Lecoq 95
  • 4 - Practical Exercises 127
  • 5 - Conclusion 153
  • Name Glossary 161
  • Bibliography 169
  • Index 177
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