The Banning of Anti-Personnel Landmines: The Legal Contribution of the International Committee of the Red Cross

By Louis Maresca; Stuart Maslen | Go to book overview
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In this context, another issue that the Symposium addressed was that of collection of information on the trade in anti-personnel mines. With a view to having States introduce the subject of mines in the Conference on Disarmament, it was felt that public access to information contained in the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms would be helpful, but it was pointed out that this information, submitted by governments, was available to governments only. However, it was possible that governments might eventually agree to make this information available to the public. Non-governmental organizations were a valuable source of information, but governments were unlikely to supply data for a voluntary register. It was also stressed that non-governmental organizations could not obtain information on a country-by-country basis, as the task would be overwhelming, but that some of them could serve as a clearing-house for information from all sources.
V. Information to the public
The Symposium also recognized the crucial importance of alerting public opinion in order to increase awareness among the military and governments. This would be an invaluable contribution towards a much-needed change in the law. The need for increased involvement of National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and their Federation, as well as United Nations agencies such as UNHCR and UNICEF, was stressed. There was also a constant need to keep the press informed about statistics on injuries caused by mines.
ANNEX II
SYMPOSIUM OF MILITARY EXPERTS ON THE MILITARY UTILITY OF
ANTI-PERSONNEL MINES
One of the recommendations of the April 1993 Symposium was the convening of a meeting of military experts in order to study the military use of anti-personnel mines and possible alternatives.The ICRC hosted a Symposium for this purpose on 10–12 January 1994. The topics covered were as follows:The military utility of anti-personnel mines:
—their use across the spectrum of conflict
—their military and cost effectiveness
—their means of delivery
—the military implications of marking/recording minefields.
Alternative systems:
—what alternative systems exist
—whether they meet military requirements

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