The Banning of Anti-Personnel Landmines: The Legal Contribution of the International Committee of the Red Cross

By Louis Maresca; Stuart Maslen | Go to book overview

15
Anti-personnel Mines: What Future for Asia?
Regional Seminar for Asian Military and Strategic Studies Experts
Manila, The Philippines
20–23 July 1997
Sponsored by the ICRC in cooperation with the government of the
Republic of the Philippines and the Philippine National Red Cross Society

Prior to the Manila Seminar, there had been little governmental discussion of the mines problem in Asia – even though a number of countries across the region were severely affected – and few Asian governments were prepared to support a total prohibition on anti-personnel mines. The Manila Seminar, which brought together regional military and strategic studies experts, was intended to consider the need for such a prohibition, balancing the military utility of landmines with their humanitarian costs. Discussions were extremely focused and, although several participants were unable fully to support the conclusions of the seminar, it was generally agreed that a total ban on anti-personnel mines was a necessary and justified objective.


Final Declaration of Participants to the
Regional Seminar for Asian Military and Strategic Studies Experts
Manila, The Philippines
23 July 1997
(with corrected signatory list as at 24.07.97)

The undersigned Asian military and strategic studies analysts from 14 countries gathered in Manila to examine the experience of anti-personnel mine use in the region. The analysts discussed the military effectiveness of anti-personnel mines based on their actual combat performance in Asian and other conflicts. The military value of AP mines was considered in the context of the long-term human, social and economic costs incurred in many of the conflicts in which this weapon has been used. Particular attention was given to the difficulties and extremely high costs of post-conflict mine clearance.

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