The Social Mode of Restoration Comedy

By Kathleen M. Lynch | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
COURT INFLUENCES ON SERIOUS DRAMA IN THE REIGN OF CHARLES I

T HE period of the reign of Charles I boasts no great names, by right of peculiar possession, on the honor-roll of its dramatists. Shirely and Brome were Elizabethan survivals. Suckling, with all his talent, wrote eccentric and wayward plays. D'Avenant was unsuited to the work assigned him. But, to a marked degree, the court had social distinction, and its influence was to be unusually far-reaching. Never before had an English court exerted a more powerful influence on contemporary manners and through that channel on contemporary literature. The French queen, Henrietta Maria, had the hardihood to impose on her followers a highly specialized system of formal etiquette, destined to have lasting effects, not only on court literature in her own day, but also on court literature in the reign of her son, Charles II. The précieuse fashions authorized by the queen had a particularly significant influence on court drama, providing it with a social mode which vastly increased its resources for the study of manners and from which, through gradual stages, the social mode of Restoration comedy developed.

When Henrietta Maria came to England in 1625 as the bride of Charles I, she brought with her social prejudices which, through her effective encouragement, were to take root and flourish in English soil. Henrietta's girlhood had witnessed the rise of the salon of the Marquise de Rambouillet, where the most brilliant and cultivated French society of the day assembled. The salon was chiefly distinguished for its encouragement of a

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Social Mode of Restoration Comedy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.