Critical Voices in School Reform: Students Living through Change

By Beth C. Rubin; Elena M. Silva | Go to book overview

Introduction

Missing voices: listening to students' experiences with school reform

Elena M. Silva and Beth C. Rubin

Without the voice of students, schools serve no purpose. They are nothing but institutions where adults run and tell you what you need to know in order to continue this tradition of, this cycle of "we have master's degrees and we know what's best for you so just shut up and deal with it."

(High school senior)

What could students, who confront, resist, and affirm both the problems and reforms that characterize their schools, offer to the traditionally adultdominated conversation about school change? Despite a small body of research emerging on the significance of "student voice" in school practices and processes (Cook-Sather, 2002; Shultz and Cook-Sather, 2001; Fielding, 2001; Rudduck and Flutter, 2000; Oldfather, 1995), embracing or empowering the voices of students is not a well-practiced approach to understanding or implementing school reforms.

Within a growing wave of reform in public schools, calls for and claims of "student-centered" goals and "student voice" initiatives pervade the process and practice of school reform efforts (Wasley et al., 1997; Olsen, 2000). Yet, more often than not, the student perspective is often represented in fixed and uncomplicated terms that undermine the true agency and diversity of students and student experiences.

Why is the student perspective of reform important? Public high schools boast greater student diversity than ever before in the history of this country (Nieto, 1999; Garcia, 1999). At the center of this diversity are hundreds of thousands of students who experience a reality relatively unknown to the adults who govern their school experience. Students' daily lives in school take place amid the richly interwoven webs of friendship and romance, the heated pulls of emerging racial, ethnic and social identities, the demands and expectations of teachers and parents, and the constructions of academic competence. Particularly in schools confronting persistent problems of racial, class and gender inequity, the significance of students' experiences

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Critical Voices in School Reform: Students Living through Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.