Critical Voices in School Reform: Students Living through Change

By Beth C. Rubin; Elena M. Silva | Go to book overview

Chapter 10

"I'm not getting any F's"

What "at risk" students say about the support they need

Beth C. Rubin


Introduction

My first semester report card was almost all F's, but now that I am in MOST getting my work done I'm not getting any F's.

(Missy, 1 tenth grade MOST student)

When one enters teacher Steven Hesperian's room during fourth period the overwhelming impression is that everyone is very busy. The room is large and sunny, with many windows, a bank of computers, and individual student desks arranged in casual groupings. On a typical day, some students are sitting by themselves and others are sitting in small groups. A few students are at the computers, others are working with Janelle Barry, the Chapter I instructional aide, and some have left for the library, the computer center, or other teachers' classrooms. Almost without exception students are engaged in school-related tasks.

The students themselves confirm this understanding of what goes on in Making Our Success Today (MOST), a support class for ninth and tenth grade students at Mountain High School. "In MOST you do your work," Tommy, a student struggling in his academic classes, told me. "The teachers help you so you can do your work." Missy, quoted above, attributed her academic reversal to "getting my work done" in the MOST class. These students are telling us, in plain language, about the type of support that is meaningful and necessary to them.

Some educational researchers call for whole school reform and structural changes in order to meet the needs of "at risk" students. Others advocate deep-seated changes in curriculum and pedagogy. Proponents of high stakes testing believe that this approach will raise achievement for all children by holding schools accountable for student scores. This chapter supplements these more sweeping reform prescriptions with what the students themselves say they need - an inventory of supports, strikingly concrete and immediate in nature, which allow them to surmount the daily challenges of life in an academically rigorous public school. This casestudy

-188-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Critical Voices in School Reform: Students Living through Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.