Social Sciences: The Big Issues

By Kath Woodward | Go to book overview

Glossary
Agency Action and energy which leads to activity on the part of human beings in directing the course of their own lives. Agency is often addressed in relation to structure, to indicate the tension between the choice and autonomy of individuals and groups, on the one hand, and the constraints of social and natural structures mostly outside their control, on the other. Whilst groups and individuals may be constrained by structures, those structures are also the product of human agency in many cases.
Capitalism An economic system which is organized around the investment of private capital in large-scale production in the pursuit of profit. Capitalism can also be seen as a historically specific stage of economic development, in the Marxist critique, which focused particularly on its manifestations in nineteenth-century England, as the exploitative economic system whereby labour, as a commodity, produced profit for the bourgeoisie, the owners of the means of production, which followed feudalism.
Class A large grouping of people who share common economic interests, experiences and lifestyles. This aspect of social divisions is linked to the economic and social organization of any society. Some social scientists give greater emphasis to the economic organization of production, especially in relation to ownership of the means of production or relegation to selling one's labour for a wage (Karl Marx). Others stress the importance of market position, that is occupation and the status that might be associated with different aspects of market position (Max Weber). Whatever the definition employed, class remains an important feature of social inequality. It is an issue which shapes social divisions in conjunction with other structures, such as gender, race and ethnicity with which class is deeply implicated.
Consumption The process which involves the purchase of goods and services. Increasingly, it is argued that production and consumption are inextricably linked. The production of goods and services is influenced by patterns of consumption and consumer choice, as well as consumption being shaped by what is produced. There is a focus on the links between production and consumption which incorporates the importance of culture in the interaction of the whole process.

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Sciences: The Big Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgements x
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - You and Me, Us and Them 19
  • Chapter 3 - Citizenship 51
  • Chapter 4 - Buying and Selling 77
  • Chapter 5 - Where Do You Come From? 103
  • Chapter 6 - Globalization 131
  • Chapter 7 - Conclusion 157
  • Glossary 169
  • Further Reading 175
  • Bibliography 177
  • Index 183
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 190

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.