AGKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to thank first and foremost the contributors to this collection, who have been through a long process (or does it feel long only to me?) to create something that I am very excited about. It is obvious but worth saying that without you this volume would not exist, and I am very grateful for your labor on it. That the pieces are all original essays, and that their authors could have published them elsewhere, but did not, is a source of considerable satisfaction for an editor working with such a wonderful group of scholars.

I would like also to thank the several readers of each chapter, who are acknowledged in the first note to most contributions-the time you have taken with these pieces has enriched them. An even larger thanks to the reviewer of the whole manuscript for Routledge, whose comments have improved the final result, and above all, the introduction.

At Routledge in London, appreciation is due to our editor, Mari Shullaw, who had the vision to support this project before it was completed, and to her assistant, Joanne Mattingly. I hope that the book comes close to the vision!

Closer to home, I am very grateful for the tireless efforts of my research assistant Joe Bandy, of the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who tracked down every missing reference. What remains missing cannot be found by human effort.

Finally, this book is dedicated to its readers, the next generation of scholars of revolution. I hope that some of them will make revolutions as well, in their own ways. And in the end, to the constant revolutionary in my life, Kum-Kum Bhavnani, and to Cerina, the new one.

-x-

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Theorizing Revolutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Agknowledgements x
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - State-Centered Approaches to Social Revolutions 11
  • 2 - Structural Theories of Revolution 38
  • 3 - Agents of Revolution 73
  • 4 - Population Growth and Revolutionary Crises 102
  • 5 - Revolution in the Real World 123
  • 6 - Gender and Revolutions 137
  • 7 - Race and the Process of the American Revolutions 168
  • 8 - Discourses and Social Forces 203
  • 9 - The Comparative-Historical Sociology of Third World Social Revolutions 227
  • Bibliography 268
  • Index 289
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