Sport and the Color Line: Black Athletes and Race Relations in Twentieth-Century America

By Patrick B. Miller; David K. Wiggins | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

Susan Cahn is Associate Professor of History at the University of Buffalo, State University of New York. She is the author of Coming on Strong: Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth Century Womens Sport (1994), which won the 1995 Book Prize from the North American Society for Sport History. Cahn has also commented frequently online and in other public forums about gender issues in sport; she has written a two-part article in the Journal of Womens History on "Women's History in the New Millenium," and is currently completing a book titled Sexual Reckonings: Adolescent Girlhood in the Modern South, 1920-1960 (forthcoming).

Harry Edwards is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley and the author of The Revolt of the Black Athlete (1969), Sociology of Sport (1973), The Struggle that Must Be (1980) and numerous articles on race and sport. A principal organizer of the Olympic Project for Human Rights, which sought a black boycott of the 1968 Olympic Games, he has been an activist as well as a scholar for more than three decades. He continues to comment frequently about minority participation in school, college, and professional sport.

Pamela Grundy is an independent historian who lives in Charlotte, North Carolina, where she pursues a variety of writing, teaching, and museum projects. She is the author of Learning to Win: Sports, Education, and Social Change in Twentieth-Century North Carolina (2001), which won the 2002 Book Prize from the North American Society for Sport History and the Herbert Feis Award of the American Historical Association. Grundy has also written several award-winning articles on southern folk culture appearing in the Journal of American History. She is currently working on a history of American women's basketball and a study of the desegregation of historically black West Charlotte High School.

Douglas Kellner is George Kneller Chair in the Philosophy of Education at UCLA and is the author of many books on social theory, politics, history, and culture, including Herbert Marcuse and the Crisis of Marxism (1984); Critical Theory, Marxism and Modernity (1989); Jean Baudrillard: From Marxism to Postmodernism and Beyond (1989); Television and the Crisis of Democracy (1990); Postmodern Theory: Critical Interrogations (with Steven Best) (1991); and Media Culture (1995).

Neil Lanctot is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of History at the University of Delaware. The author of Fair Dealing and Clean Playing: The Hilldale Club and the Development of Black Professional Baseball, 1910-1932, (1994) he has written extensively about the institutional workings of the Negro Leagues. His forthcoming study is tentatively titled Helping the Race Morally and Financially: Black Professional Baseball and the Negro National Leagues, 1933-1952.

Rita Liberti is Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education at California State University, Hayward. Her dissertation is entitled "'We Were Ladies, We Just Played Basketball Like Boys': A Study of Women's Basketball at Historically Black Colleges and Universities in North Carolina, 1925-1945" (1998). She is currently conducting

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