The Child in Mind: A Child Protection Handbook

By Judy Barker; Deborah T. Hodes | Go to book overview

9

Failure to thrive

FAILURE TO THRIVE describes children who do not adequately gain weight or achieve the expected rate of growth for their age. In addition it includes infants and young children whose length has fallen below the norm. Although mostly used with reference to babies and young children, failure to thrive can persist throughout childhood and into adolescence. If it passes unrecognised and untreated it has potentially adverse consequences for a child's health and development.

Failure to thrive can be organic (a feature of many medical conditions) or non-organic, or a mixture of both. What causes failure to thrive is complex and varied, and there are both genetic and environmental influences. Organic failure to thrive usually has a physiological basis and is associated with inadequate nutrition secondary to gastrointestinal disorders, chronic infection, major structural congenital abnormalities, and metabolic and endocrine defects. Non-organic failure to thrive is also linked to inadequate nutrition, but refers to children whose failure to grow has no underlying medical condition. In some cases it may be accompanied by other concerns about the child's well being and safety. Whatever causal factors are involved, all children who fail to thrive have a less than adequate intake of calories and are therefore not able to grow well.

Organic and non-organic factors commonly co-exist, and the presence of one often leads to the rise of the other. Failure to thrive may be associated with all types of child maltreatment, including emotional abuse and neglect. In some cases poor growth is a marker that signals a child in need of protection as well as a child in need.

Feeding or eating problems are common in children whether they

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Child in Mind: A Child Protection Handbook
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 108

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.