Narrative in the Professional Age: Transatlantic Readings of Harriet Beecher Stowe, George Eliot, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

By Jennifer Cognard-Black | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THIS PROJECT HAS BEEN A LENGTHY ONE, AND I AM GRATEFUL TO THE MANY people who, over the past few years and in different ways, have helped me write it.

First and foremost, I wish to thank members of The Ohio State University's Department of English, especially Susan S. Williams. Susan's knowledge of archival research, nineteenth-century transatlanticisms, and the culture of Victorian professionalism have been indispensable to me as I have developed this manuscript, and I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to learn from such a thorough and perceptive scholar. I am similarly indebted to Marlene Longenecker and Cathy Shuman (who now works bibliographic magic at MLA), both of whom painstakingly read chapter drafts and provided me with invaluable counsel. Marlene's capacious knowledge of feminist literary history and Victorian literature have done me in very good stead, while Cathy vigilantly reminded me that the world is not made up of dualisms. Although Debra Moddelmog did not directly help with preparing this manuscript, her influence is stamped on every page. There is no one who has taught me more about the political and social ramifications of literature, and every aspect of my professional work has been, and continues to be, influenced by Debra's guidance. And, finally, special thanks goes to Andrea Lunsford (who now resides at Stanford). Andrea asked me questions no one else could, helping me to see my arguments through a rhetorical lens, yet Andrea also has shown me what it means to be a selfless, loving, and gracious human being-and for these lessons I owe her everything.

I am additionally grateful to Steve Fink, Roger Cognard, Anne MacLeod Cognard, Andrew Cognard-Black, Cheryl Gunness, and Jeffrey Hammond for providing me with discerning suggestions. As a result of Steve's impressive apprehension of nineteenth-century American literature, my fathers editorial savvy, my mother's creative connections between writer and text, my partner's careful reading skills,

-xiii-

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Narrative in the Professional Age: Transatlantic Readings of Harriet Beecher Stowe, George Eliot, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • List of Cited Collections xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter One - "You Are as Thoroughly Woman as You Are English" 27
  • Chapter Two - "The Wild and Distracted Call for Proof" 63
  • Chapter Three - "A More Living Interest" 87
  • Chapter Four - "Proclaiming the Royal Lineage to the Average Mind" 117
  • Afterword 149
  • Notes 151
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 205
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