Narrative in the Professional Age: Transatlantic Readings of Harriet Beecher Stowe, George Eliot, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

By Jennifer Cognard-Black | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps [ESP], letter to Richard Watson Gilder, 13 November 1908, Richard Watson Gilder Papers, Manuscripts and Archives Division, NY Public Lib., NY. By 1908, Phelps went by her married name Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward, but for the purposes of clarity, this study retains her unmarried name throughout.
2
ESP, letter to Richard Watson Gilder, 10 November 1908, Richard Watson Gilder Papers, Manuscripts and Archives Division, NY Public Lib., NY.
3
For a discussion of economic language and its relation to the rise of professionalism in the United States, see chapter two on "Space and Words" in Burton Bledstein's pioneering study The Culture of Professionalism.
4
ESP, letter to Richard Watson Gilder, 10 November 1908, Richard Watson Gilder Papers, Manuscripts and Archives Division, NY Public Lib., NY.
5
See Jonathan Freedman's Professions of Taste.
6
For a summary of Phelps's relationship with Stowe, see Phelps's autobiography, Chapters from a Life, pages 131-140. Not only was Phelps a visitor to the Stowe household in Andover, she was once a guest at Stowe's summer home in Mandarin (or as Phelps erroneously names it, "Magnolia"), Florida.
7
Stowe, of course, became a best-selling author with the serial publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin in 1851-1852. Uncle Tom's Cabin is purported to have made Stowe $10,000 from the first three months' sales alone, what a reviewer for the London Times called "the largest sum of money ever received by an author, either American or European, from the sale of a single work in so short a period of time" (Hedrick 223). In the first week, the novel sold 10,000 copies, and in the first year that number climbed to 300,000. The novel sold even more copies abroad than in America; by the end of 1852, various legitimate and pirated editions made for one-and-a-half million sales in England, and the book was translated into more than forty languages, including Dutch, Swedish, French, German, Italian, Danish, Flemish, Polish, and Magyar (Mott 118). Indeed, the sales and distribution patterns of Uncle Tom's Cabin are often

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Narrative in the Professional Age: Transatlantic Readings of Harriet Beecher Stowe, George Eliot, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • List of Cited Collections xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter One - "You Are as Thoroughly Woman as You Are English" 27
  • Chapter Two - "The Wild and Distracted Call for Proof" 63
  • Chapter Three - "A More Living Interest" 87
  • Chapter Four - "Proclaiming the Royal Lineage to the Average Mind" 117
  • Afterword 149
  • Notes 151
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.