Geometric Greece: 900-700 BC

By J. N. Coldstream | Go to book overview

Glossary
Abecedaria: Series of alphabetic letters, written for practice or instruction.
Angora: Place of assembly.
Amphora: A large jar with two handles, placed horizontally or vertically.
Amphoriskos: A small amphora.
Anta: Forward end of a side-wall projected to form a porch.
Apsidal: With one end curved; used of buildings or tombs.
Aristoi: 'The best people': aristocrats, upper classes.
Aryballos: Small unguent flask with short neck.
Ashlar: Style of masonry, squared and dressed in rectangular blocks.
Bothros: Pit in a sanctuary, for sacrifices of votives.
Bucchero: Grey-black pottery, fired in a kiln from which oxygen has been excluded.
Chamber tomb: A tomb designed for multiple burial, cut into rock; the burial chamber is approached by a narrower passage (dromos).
Cippus: Phoenician stone pillar used as grave marker
Cist (grave): A grave lined and covered with stone slabs, usually intended for single burial.
Dromos: See chamber tomb.
Ekphora: A funeral procession, carrying the deceased to the place if burial.
Fibula: A brooch, for fastening drapery.
Filigree: Decoration of gold jewellery, consisting of thin wires soldered on a background.
Genos: Aristocratic clan.
Glaze: A term used (erroneously) for a dark coating on Greek Iron Age pottery, consisting of a solution of the clay.
Granulation: Decoration of gold jewellery, consisting of minute grains of gold soldered onto the background.
Hekatompedon: A temple, one hundred feet long.
Heroön: A sanctuary founded in honour of a hero.
Hoplite: A heavy-armed Greek soldier, equipped with bronze armour.
Hydria: A water jar with one vertical handle from mouth to belly, and two horizontal handles on the belly.
Impasto: Used of Italic pottery with a dark monochrome coating.
Intaglio: A design cut into a seal.
Kados: A two-handled jar for cooking.
Kalathos: A shallow bowl with wide and flaring mouth.
Kantharos: A drinking-vessel with two vertical handles.

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Geometric Greece: 900-700 BC
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface to the Second Edition 3
  • Preface to the First Edition 4
  • Contents 5
  • Contents 8
  • Acknowledgements 9
  • Abbreviations 12
  • Introduction 17
  • I - The Passing of the Dark Ages C. 900-770 B.C. 23
  • 1 - Isolation: the Early Ninth Century 25
  • 2 - The Awakening in the Mid-Ninth Century 55
  • 3 - Consolidation: Late Ninth to Early Eighth Century 73
  • II - The Greek Renaissance C. 770-700 B.C. Regional Survey 107
  • 4 - Athens and Attica 109
  • 5 - The Argolid, Arcadia, Laconia, and Messenia 140
  • 6 - Corinth and West Greece 167
  • 7 - Euboea, Boeotia, Thessaly, and the Cyclades 191
  • 8 - Italy and Sicily: Trade and Colonies 221
  • 9 - Eastern Greece and Anatolia 246
  • 10 - Crete 271
  • III - Life in Eighth-Century Greece 293
  • 11 - The Recovery of Literacy 295
  • 12 - Towns and Villages 303
  • 13 - Sanctuaries, Gods, and Votives 317
  • 14 - Recollection of a Heroic Past 341
  • 15 - Oriental Influences 358
  • 16 - Epilogue 367
  • Supplement 371
  • Epilogue 414
  • Glossary 416
  • Bibliography and Site Index 418
  • Index 443
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