The New Economy in East Asia and the Pacific

By Peter Drysdale | Go to book overview

6.2

The Indian experience

Mangesh G. Korgaonker


INTRODUCTION

The 'Silicon Valley phenomenon' is characterised by the continuous creation and development of high technology firms (those dedicated to the design and production of new products or processes through the systematic application of scientific knowledge and the most advanced technologies). The firms have a high proportion of scientists and engineers (at least 40 per cent) and a large expenditure in research and development (R&D). The Silicon Valley phenomenon is founded on certain critical ingredients: a nearby first-rank university (Stanford); the creation of one of the first industrial and technology parks in the United States; having an abundant supply of cheap migrant labour; having an abundant supply of venture capital from private capital investment firms and military institutions; and having a pleasant natural and cultural environment.

Is Silicon Valley a replicable model? Arguably, it is the most successful innovative environment in history, but even in the United States replication has not been at all easy or assured. Many Silicon Valley clones have discovered that creating a local company incubator is harder than it looks. It takes a unique combination of entrepreneurial personalities, venture capital, smart investors, and a business community that supports entrepreneurship through a matrix of suppliers, consultants or service companies. These ingredients are not available in many technological enclaves.

In the Asia Pacific region, there is a also a need to distinguish between the universal spread of innovative capacity, the spread of high-tech production sites and the ensuing growth of cross-border production networks throughout the region. It could be argued that the spread of production sites will depend on the 'de-verticalisation' of production processes and the resulting formation of inter-plant networks in localities where multinational corporations (MNCs) have an established presence. These local networks, often dubbed 'small-scale Silicon valleys', could resemble the networks that spontaneously developed in Silicon Valley and constituted the framework for the spurt in the area's innovation and production potential.

-108-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Economy in East Asia and the Pacific
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.