Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials

By Nathan C. Leites; Elsa Bernaut | Go to book overview

Epilogue: The Image of Betrayal, 1949-1954

The break between the Yugoslav and Soviet Politburos, and the liquidation processes in the leadership of various satellite Communist Parties, have been the occasion for the elaboration of a contemporary Bolshevik image of the Bolshevik traitor-leader;1* an image which diverges in significant ways from the picture presented in the Moscow trials studied in this book.

From 1939 until the end of 1952 Communist allegations about enemy agents within a Communist Party never concerned the Soviet Party. It is true that "terrorism," "wrecking," "diversion," "espionage" became master categories of the public Stalinist view of politics in the later thirties; but they were almost empty boxes in the official self-description of the Soviet Union between the end of the Yezhovshchina in 1938 and the inculpation of the Kremlin physicians on January 13, 1953. On the other hand, recent Eastern European developments have been accompanied by the copious use of these extreme categories, and by new elaborations which allow one to speculate on changes in the esoteric temper of the Stalinist elite between the late thirties and the early fifties.

It is exceedingly doubtful whether the top levels of the Soviet and Eastern European parties do, on the whole, consciously believe the image of agents- in-the-party which they are communicating with such emphasis. But they presumably do believe that these stories have a useful impact on the "masses" outside and inside the Party, and even on the "apparatus" below the top. They probably also feel that what they allege publicly corresponds in some measure to what happened really--if one applies to reality certain rules of translation; rules which adapt a complicated truth to the limited comprehension of men who need extreme stimuli to react properly.

Relatively clear hints of how the presentation of a deposed leader as an enemy agent is arrived at were given in Gottwald's speech on Slansky in the Czechoslovak Central Committee, December 6, 1951.2 Rendering his points more explicit, we may restate them as follows:

(1) The role of the Party after the conquest of power is yet greater than before, and the enemy knows this:

-350-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.