Secrets of Screen Acting

By John Stamp; Patrick Tucker | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book started with a letter: "Sometimes the way to get books to happen is to put contracts in the post. So I'm doing just that," and so without Bill Germano's spur, and the support from the team at Routledge, this book would not have started or finished.

I started to write it when I was working on television dramas in Vordingborg, Denmark; Dublin, Ireland; and Liverpool, England; and finished in London and New York; so directly and indirectly I owe thanks to TV2 Øst's Landsbyen, Radio Telefís Éireann's Fair City, and Mersey Televisions Brookside.

I started my screen acting classes in 1975 at the Drama Studio London, and have continued there and at the Webber Douglas Academy for Dramatic Art ever since. My thanks go to the two Principals involved, Peter Layton and Raphael Jago, who have encouraged me to present and develop a brand new acting class. Thanks also go to all those in New York, especially the Margots, who have helped me bring my Screen Acting Workshops to New York so successfully over the years.

Finally, my thanks are due to Andrew Tucker for his work on the index, and to Christine who, amongst many other burdens, had to sit through the Rambo films counting how many words were spoken by the action hero.

-xi-

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