The Psychology of Music: A Survey for Teacher and Musician

By Max Schoen | Go to book overview

INDEX OF SUBJECTS
Aesthetic experience in music, 127- 147
appreciation and, 142-145
basis of, 134-142
beautiful in music and, 127-129, 132-134
emotions and, 127-129
experimental studies on, 129-134
types of listeners and, 129-132
views of aestheticians on, 127-129
Aesthetic response to music, 134-142
Affective musical effects, 87-113
Appreciation, musical, 144-147
Artistic singing,
phases of, 215-219
pitch intonation in, 194-201
tonal attack in, 198, 200
tonal movement in, 199, 200
tonal release in, 198, 200
tonal steadiness in, 198, 199-200
vibrato in, 202-215
Beautiful in music, 127-129, 132-134
Cadence, test of, 173
Cent, definition of, 26
Chords,
fusion of, 65-67
relation of major and minor, 66, 67
tests of analysis of, 180
Combination of tones, 24-69
Concord, definition of, 65
Consonance,
Chord of Nature in, 60
components of, 56-58
configuration in, 59
criteria for, 58
definition of, 47
historical aspect of, 62-65
test of, 174
theory of beats in, 58-59
theory of fusion in, 47-58
Discord, definition of, 65
Dissonance, 58-59
use of, 61
Duration, 20-22
rhythm and, 21
rhythmic phenomena and, 21-22
time and, 20-21
Effects,
affective, 87-113
emotional, 71-72, 76, 86-89, 109- 111
feeling, 70-71, 73-74, 86, 91-95, 109- 111
harmonic, 101, 111, 112
ideational, 70-86
major and minor, 72-74, 95-99
melody, 100-101, 102-103, 111, 112
modality, 102
mood, 89-91, 102
of intervals and motifs, 74-78
of keys, 70-74
of musical compositions, 79-85
physiological and medicinal, 103- 108
pitch, 99-100
rhythm, 101, 102, 103, 111, 112
sensory, 70, 72-73, 75-76
tempo, 102
Enjoyment, 108-113
components of, 108-109
conditions for, 135
emotional effect and, 109-111
familiarity and, 90, 113
nature of musical, 108-113
repetition and, 112-113
sources and factors of, 109-113
types of listeners and, 114-126
Extensity, 22-23
discrimination of, 22-23
relation of intensity to, 23
relation of pitch to, 22-23
volumic effect of, 22

-255-

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