Neighbors, Not Friends: Iraq and Iran after the Gulf Wars

By Dilip Hiro | Go to book overview

PREFACE

This is the last book in the trilogy which started with my book The Longest War: The Iran-Iraq Military Conflict - followed by Desert Shield to Desert Storm: The Second Gulf War. Its sub-title "Iraq and Iran after the Gulf Wars" is self-explanatory; and like its predecessors, it is meant for the general reader. The common thread that holds the trilogy together is Saddam Hussein, who became president of Iraq in 1979 and shows no sign of relinquishing office.

Iraq and Iran are heavyweights in the Gulf which possesses two-thirds of the global reserves of petroleum on which Western economies depend heavily. At the current rate of extraction these reserves will last eighty-three years. By contrast, at present production levels, the American oil deposits will be exhausted in ten years, the British in five, and the Norwegian in nine. 1 Between them, Iran and Iraq have a fifth of the world's petroleum reserves and its second largest natural gas deposits. They are the two most populous states in the region, and occupy strategic positions on the globe.

Each of them has the distinction of having impacted directly on recent US presidential elections. One of the main reasons why Democrat President Jimmy Carter (r. 1977-80) lost his campaign for re-election in 1980 was his failure to secure the release of the American hostages held by Iran. After his victory in the Second Gulf War between the US-led Coalition and Iraq in March 1991, President George Bush (r. 1989-92), a Republican, became so popular - with his ratings soaring to 91 percent - that his re-election in 1992 seemed assured. This perception discouraged leading Democrat politicians from entering the race for their party's nomination, and inadvertently paved the way for the election as president of a comparatively unknown governor of an obscure southern state of Arkansas, Bill Clinton (r. 1993-2000).

These, in short, are the compelling reasons why it matters a lot to the West what happens in Iraq and Iran.

The relationship between them has a long history. As part of the ancient Persian empire, the Mesopotamian plain to the west of the Zagros Mountains was called Eraq (Persian, lowland), the name that has survived to this day. And Baghdad is made up of the Persian words Bag, meaning God, and dad, meaning gift.

Since Persia (a derivative of Pars/Fars) was officially renamed Iran (a derivative

-xxxi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Neighbors, Not Friends: Iraq and Iran after the Gulf Wars
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page vii
  • Contents ix
  • Plates xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Glossary of Arabic, Kurdish and Persian Words xvi
  • Preface xxxi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Iraq 43
  • 1 - Saddam Center-Stage, Exit Bush 45
  • 2 - Enter Clinton, Saddam's New Nemesis 69
  • 3 - A Shattering Betrayal, Then Lucky Breaks for Saddam 90
  • 4 - The Mother of All Failed Coups 102
  • 5 - Saddam and Re-Elected Clinton 120
  • 6 - "Desert Thunder" That Didn't Thunder 135
  • 7 - Operation "Desert Fox" 154
  • 8 - Iraq, a Return to Normalcy 179
  • Part II - Iran 193
  • 9 - Rafsanjani's Reconstruction and Economic Liberalization 195
  • 10 - Khatami, a Moderate with a Mission 225
  • 11 - Political Reform and Reaction 241
  • 12 - Reform Restrained 265
  • Conclusions and Future Prospects 281
  • Epilog 301
  • Appendix I 311
  • Appendix II 313
  • Appendix III 315
  • Appendix IV 324
  • Appendix V 326
  • Appendix VI 331
  • Notes 341
  • Select Bibliography 365
  • News Agencies, Newspapers and Periodicals 367
  • Index 369
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 389

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.