Neighbors, Not Friends: Iraq and Iran after the Gulf Wars

By Dilip Hiro | Go to book overview

8

IRAQ, A RETURN TO NORMALCY

On December 11, 1999, a draft resolution on Iraq prepared by Britain and Holland was presented to the UN Security Council, even though the five Permanent Members had not reached a consensus on it. The reason for the rush was that the Anglo-Saxon duo on the Council wanted to take advantage of Britain's presidency of the month. During the debate the objections raised by Russia, France and China were so strong that President Jeremy Greenstock feared a veto by one of them. To avoid this, he thrice postponed the vote, thus also giving an opportunity to the resolution's sponsors to amend it and make it palatable to the objectors. In the end the non-Anglo-Saxon trio abstained, as did Malaysia, when the vote was finally taken on December 17.

Like its all-inclusive predecessor, the 34-clause Resolution 687, the 39-clause Resolution 1284 was passed under Chapter VII of the UN Charter. Its Section A, dealing with disarmament, set up a new UN Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (Unmovic) to replace Unscom. Unmovic was required to establish and operate "a reinforced system of ongoing monitoring and verification … and address unresolved disarmament issues" and "identify … additional sites in Iraq to be covered by the reinforced system of ongoing monitoring and verification." Within thirty days of the resolution being adopted, the UN secretary-general was required to appoint an Executive Chairman of Unmovic, subject to the approval of the Security Council, and a new College of Commissioners for Unmovic. The new Executive Chairman of Unmovic was to be given forty-five days to submit plans for organization and staff. And, from the date they started working in Iraq, Unmovic and the IAEA were to be given sixty days within which to produce a work program for the discharge of their mandates, which would include "the key remaining disarmament tasks to be completed by Iraq" and ensure that "each task shall be clearly defined and precise." Paragraph 6 stated that Unmovic staff would be regarded as international civil servants "subject to Article 100 of the Charter of the United Nations, drawn from the broadest possible geographical base." This would distinguish it from its Unscom predecessor to which personnel were loaned by member-states and who did not become part of the UN bureaucracy.

Section B referred to the missing Kuwaiti nationals and property. Section C

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Neighbors, Not Friends: Iraq and Iran after the Gulf Wars
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page vii
  • Contents ix
  • Plates xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Glossary of Arabic, Kurdish and Persian Words xvi
  • Preface xxxi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Iraq 43
  • 1 - Saddam Center-Stage, Exit Bush 45
  • 2 - Enter Clinton, Saddam's New Nemesis 69
  • 3 - A Shattering Betrayal, Then Lucky Breaks for Saddam 90
  • 4 - The Mother of All Failed Coups 102
  • 5 - Saddam and Re-Elected Clinton 120
  • 6 - "Desert Thunder" That Didn't Thunder 135
  • 7 - Operation "Desert Fox" 154
  • 8 - Iraq, a Return to Normalcy 179
  • Part II - Iran 193
  • 9 - Rafsanjani's Reconstruction and Economic Liberalization 195
  • 10 - Khatami, a Moderate with a Mission 225
  • 11 - Political Reform and Reaction 241
  • 12 - Reform Restrained 265
  • Conclusions and Future Prospects 281
  • Epilog 301
  • Appendix I 311
  • Appendix II 313
  • Appendix III 315
  • Appendix IV 324
  • Appendix V 326
  • Appendix VI 331
  • Notes 341
  • Select Bibliography 365
  • News Agencies, Newspapers and Periodicals 367
  • Index 369
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 389

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.