Stylistics: A Resource Book for Students

By Paul Simpson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I would like to thank Sonia Zyngier and Greg Watson for their helpful comments on an earlier proposal for this book, and Fran Brearton and Michael Longley for their help during the book's later stages. As ever, special thanks go to Janice Hoadley for her patience and perseverance, on both the family and academic fronts. I am also grateful to my friends and colleagues in the Poetics and Linguistics Association for their support over the years, and to my students, well, everywhere I suppose, for their participation in the various seminars and tutorials that helped shape parts of section C of the book. I am especially indebted to Derek Attridge, Mary Louise Pratt, Katie Wales, Mick Short, Margaret Freeman and Bill Nash for kindly allowing me to reproduce some of their work in section D.

My thanks are due to Routledge's steadfast team of Louisa Semlyen, Christy Kirkpatrick and Kate Parker, and to series consultant Ron Carter for his friendship and support for the best part of a quarter of a century. Finally, a huge debt of gratitude goes to series editor Peter Stockwell, not least for his uncanny knack of weeding out superfluous blarney which helped keep the length of the book within the bounds of decency. Any waffle, nonsense or unnecessary digression that may remain is of course entirely the fault of the author.

Derek Attridge, 'Fff! Oo!; Nonlexical Onomatopoeia' from Peculiar Language: Literature as Difference from the Renaissance to James Joyce Methuen, 1988. Reproduced by permission of Taylor and Francis Books Ltd (Methuen).

D. Burton, extract from 'Through Glass Darkly, Through Dark Glasses' from Language and Literature by Ronald Carter, published by Unwin Hyman/Routledge 1982. Reproduced by permission of Taylor & Francis Ltd.

Ronald Carter, 'What is Stylistics and Why Can We Teach it in Different Ways?' from Reading, Analysing and Teaching Literature edited by Mike Short, Longman 1989. Reproduced by permission of Ronald Carter.

e e cummings, 'love is more thicker than forget' is reprinted from Complete Poems 1904-1962, edited by George J. Firmage, by permission of W. W. Norton & Company. Copyright © 1991 by the Trustees for the e e cummings Trust and George James Firmage.

Roger Fowler, extracts from The Languages of Literature published by Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd, 1971. Reproduced by permission of Taylor & Francis Ltd.

Ralph W. Franklin, ed., text reprinted from The Poems of Emily Dickinson, by permission of the publishers and the Trustees of Amherst College, Cambridge, Mass.:

-xiii-

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Stylistics: A Resource Book for Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • How to Use This Book v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations xii
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • A1 - What is Stylistics? 2
  • B1 - Developments in Stylistics 50
  • C1 - Is There a 'Literary Language'? 98
  • How to Use These Readings 148
  • Further Reading 225
  • References 233
  • Primary Sources 241
  • Glossarial Index 243
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