The Integrative Family Therapy Supervisor: A Primer

By Robert E. Lee; Craig A. Everett | Go to book overview

Chapter 9

Cultural and Contextual Issues in Supervision

It has been our impression, albeit a generalization, that many supervision classes tend to assume that supervisors belonging to the majority culture are supervising therapists who belong to the majority culture, and they in turn are treating clients who are members of the majority culture. These classes may include a token session, often toward the end of the course, wherein the instructors discuss supervision of therapists from the majority culture who are providing clinical services to clients who are members of a minority group. We have found that occasionally there may also be a discussion of majority culture supervisors' work with therapists who are members of a minority group. However, we have not seen a course that, from the beginning, recognizes that the training system may include any combination of majority and minority culture individuals at all levels of the training system.

A Native American supervisor recently described his work with a Latina therapist who had been providing services on a reservation with a tribal culture different from his own. As marriage and family therapy moves out of the middleclass offices of cities and suburbs, and as training programs become more effective in recruiting international students (e.g., AAMFT, 2002b), we can assume that such complexity in the training experiences for all of us will become the rule rather than the exception. As supervisors and leaders in the field, we need to anticipate and address these needs carefully, and help ourselves and our trainees gain a level of cultural competence.

As supervisors and educators we need to become culturally competent and be able to facilitate culturally competent training and therapy. With that in mind, consider your personal answers to the following questions.

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Integrative Family Therapy Supervisor: A Primer
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 198

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.