Planning for Crime Prevention: A Transatlantic Perspective

By Richard H. Schneider; Ted Kitchen | Go to book overview

LIST OF TABLES
2.1 Percentage of crimes reported to the police, 1981 and 1995 30
2.2 Percentage of crimes in England and Wales estimated to have been reported to the police in 1997 in rank order 31
2.3 Recording of reported crimes by the police in 1995 in the USA and in England and Wales 32
2.4 Crime rates per 1,000 population according to police records and to surveys, USA and England and Wales, 1995 36
2.5 Key statistics on crime trends, USA, 1981-1996 37
2.6 Public views about the most important problem facing the USA in the twenty-first century 39
2.7 Crime risks by size of urban areas, USA, 1998 40
2.8 Crime rates by type of area, USA, 1998 40
2.9 Crime rates by selected family income ranges, USA, 1998 41
2.10 Crime victim rates by income and by race, USA, 1998 42
2.11 Recorded crimes per 100,000 population, Sheffield and Manchester, 1975-1990 45
2.12 British Crime Survey - numbers of crime incidents (in thousands), 1981-1999, selected categories and all crimes 47
2.13 Key statistics on crime trends, Britain, 1981-1999 48
2.14 Some key components in the geographical distribution of risks of burglary, 1997 49
2.15 Proportions of adults who were victims of violence in 1997, by age and sex 50
2.16 Proportions of victims of violence victimised more than once in 1997 51
2.17 Comparative crime rates, USA and England and Wales 54
2.18 Comparative crime rates, crimes of violence, USA and England and Wales 56
2.19 Crimes per 100,000 people, 1998, from police records for selected 'comparator' countries 57
2.20 Incarceration rates by race, USA and England and Wales, 1991 58
4.1 The 'Three-D' approach 98

-xi-

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