Ecological Relations: Towards An Inclusive Politics of the Earth

By Susan Board | Go to book overview

So the struggle persists. The intellectual paucity to conceptually perceive relations in a holistic manner is translated into discriminatory injustice and incremental degradation of life forces according to a political philosophy of naturalised abuse. However, this case study has demonstrated that it is possible to broaden IR's metaphysical horizons. Practically, indigenous peoples' involvement within the decision-making process alleviates the negative energies required for conflict and opens up a dialogue concerning pursuit of the common good. Not only will a forum of inclusive dialogue ensue but also it will arise from the multiplicity of epistemologies contextualised by the diversity of ontological contexts and cosmological world-views existent in this rich world.


Notes
1
Gray, C. (1991) 'The Impact of Biodiversity Conservation on Indigenous Peoples', in Shiva, V., Anderson, P., Schücking, H., Gray, A., Lohmann, L. and Cooper, D. Biodiversity: Social and Ecological Perspectives, London: Zed Books.
2
Secretariat of the Independent Commission on International Humanitarian Issues (1987) Indigenous Peoples: A Global Quest for Justice, London: Zed Books.
3
Wearne, P. (1996) Return of the Indian: Conquest and Revival in the Americas, London: Cassel in association with Latin America Bureau.
4
Aware that my legitimacy as an outsider is problematic, I strive to be conscious of the limitations of the globalising language, English, and, whenever possible, allow illustrative examples to speak for themselves.
5
Secretariat of the Independent Commission on International Humanitarian Issues, (1987) p. 11.
6
Díaz Polanco, H. (Rayas, L., trans.) (1997) Indigenous Peoples in Latin America: The Quest for Self-Determination, Oxford: Westview Press, p. x.
7
Gray, (1991) p. 61.
8
Baumann, M., Bell, J., Koechlin, F. and Pimbert, M., for Worldwide Fund for Nature and Swissaid (1996) The Life Industry: Biodiversity, People and Profits, London: Intermediate Technology Publications.
9
World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) Our Common Future, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 114-115. This is also the thesis of Norberg-Hodge, H. (1991) Ancient Futures: Learning from Ladakh, London: Rider.
10
Wearne, (1996).
11
Hirsch, P. (1990) 'Review Essay: Marginal People on Marginal Land', Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, 22, (4), 55-59.
12
Secretariat of the Independent Commission on International Humanitarian Issues, (1987).
13
This is also particularly true of the sub-discipline, International Political Economy; Tooze, R. and Murphy, C. N. (1996) 'The Epistemology of Poverty and the Poverty of Epistemology in IPE: Mystery, Blindness, and Invisibility', Millennium: Journal of International Studies, 25 (3), 681-707.
14
Secretariat of the Independent Commission on International Humanitarian Issues, (1987).
15
Goodman, D. and Redclift, M. (1991) Environment and Development in Latin America: The Politics of Sustainability, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
16
Cf. hooks, b. (1991) 'Choosing the margin as a space of radical openness', in

-217-

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Ecological Relations: Towards An Inclusive Politics of the Earth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Exclusivity of International Relations 9
  • Notes 30
  • 2 - Understandings of an Ecological Perspective 36
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - System Building and 'Game Openings' 67
  • 4 - Ecological Relations 97
  • 5 - Ecological Relations 138
  • Notes 170
  • 6 - Ecological Relations 177
  • Notes 217
  • Conclusion 227
  • Index 237
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