Ecological Relations: Towards An Inclusive Politics of the Earth

By Susan Board | Go to book overview

Conclusion

Towards an inclusive politics of the earth

Yet at the conclusion of their sermons, in which the inevitability of the End - of industrialization, of civilization, of man, of life on this planet - is convincingly described if not proved, another way forward is presented. The ecologists end up by appealing to the rationality of their readers; if everyone would grasp what is at stake, then - apparently - everything would not be lost. These sudden about-turns smack of conversion rhetoric. The horror of the predicted catastrophe contrasts sharply with the mildness of the admonition with which we are allowed to escape. This contrast is so obvious and so central that both sides of the argument undermine each other. At least one of them fails to convince. Either the final exhortation, which addresses us in mild terms, or the analysis which is intended to alarm us. 1

It is hoped that the argument presented here avoids this fault. Throughout this book I have argued that IR, as currently theorised and practised, deliberately misses the full picture of relations upon earth. Such a restrictive epistemological and paradigmatic basis not only does injustice to the integrity of the lives of those omitted relations, namely women, nonhuman animals and indigenous peoples, but also further intensifies the socially constructed isolation of those who benefit. Politics conducted from such a powerfully constructed yet ecologically and socially precarious epistemological base does not logically have the ability to perceive the interdependent ontological relationships that we have with earth and with each other.

The cosmological insecurity of Western-educated people that manifests itself in ambitious attempts to conquer the depths and extremes of life, genetically and spatially, is a continuation of Baconian control and short-termist use and may only be appeased when nature and culture are recognised as mutually constitutive and interdependent spheres of life. To reside at ease on earth, in harmony with all biological and cultural diverse relations, humanity needs to begin with a perceived reverence for the fact that earth is the home of all and that no body can truly exist in isolation. The discipline of IR, in essence, was constructed upon this latter premise; that competition and/or co-operation with others is an inevitability. However, instead of conceptually fragmenting the world and generalising all within society as conforming to

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ecological Relations: Towards An Inclusive Politics of the Earth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Exclusivity of International Relations 9
  • Notes 30
  • 2 - Understandings of an Ecological Perspective 36
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - System Building and 'Game Openings' 67
  • 4 - Ecological Relations 97
  • 5 - Ecological Relations 138
  • Notes 170
  • 6 - Ecological Relations 177
  • Notes 217
  • Conclusion 227
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.