Human Nature after Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction

By Janet Radcliffe Richards | Go to book overview

Suggestions for further reading

Chapters 1 and 2

The Copernican Revolution, by Thomas Kuhn, is by now quite an old book, but it gives a wonderful sense of how people standing on the surface of the earth, looking at points of light in the sky, could move from that position to the understanding that the earth was the same kind of thing.

Darwin: A life in Science, by Michael White and John Gribbin, one of many biographies of Darwin, also contains a fascinating account of the surprisingly long history of pre-Darwinian speculations about evolution.

Created from Animals: The Moral Implications of Darwinism, by James Rachels, is an excellent, well argued and accessible introduction to Darwinism and philosophy, dealing with religion, animals and ethics in general.

Darwin's Dangerous Idea, by Daniel Dennett, another philosophical introduction to Darwinian matters, is extensively trailed in this book, and needs little further introduction. Dennett is in the thick of Darwinian controversy and therefore has his opponents, but even they would probably admit that the book was a real tour de force, with a wonderful scientific and philosophical sweep.

Evidence and Enquiry: Towards Reconstruction in Epistemology, by Susan Haack, is a recent analysis of questions about knowledge and evidence. It is serious philosophy - not a light read - but a first-rate study of some of the questions introduced in Chapter 2.

The Flamingo's Smile: Reflections in Natural History, in which the essay on Gosse appears, is one of Stephen Jay Gould's many collections of essays on Darwinian and related matters. Gould is one of the best-known combatants in the Darwin wars, but even people who disagree with many of his views would probably agree that his essays are delightful reading and full of interest. Ideal bedtime reading for newcomers to this terrain.

Chapters 3 and 4

The Moral Animal, by Robert Wright, is an immensely good read and an excellent popular introduction to evolutionary psychology.

The Red Queen: Sex and the Evolution of Human Nature, by Matt Ridley, is also very good. It is quite difficult in the first half, but becomes easier later, and connects well with the material of Chapter 3.

-304-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Nature after Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.