New Public Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects

By Kate McLaughlin; Stephen P. Osborne et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 1

The New Public Management in context

Stephen P. Osborne and Kate McLaughlin

Introduction

Debate over the nature and import of the New Public Management (NPM) is as intense today as it has been over the last decade. This book is concerned with exploring this debate. This introduction will provide the context for the chapters which follow and frame some key questions to consider in this debate. The first section will situate the NPM within the historical development of public administration and management in the UK, and the second section will broaden this context to a global one. The concluding section will highlight some key questions to consider in evaluating the impact of the NPM.


Public management in the UK: a four-stage model

The nature of public services, and of research and theory about them, has changed dramatically over the last 100 years. Drawing upon the experience of the UK, it is possible to distinguish four distinctive stages of development, starting from the late nineteenth century onwards. Other nations will present with variations upon this model, but it is a useful classification, nonetheless.

The late nineteenth century, as Thatcher never tired of reminding us in the UK, was the period of the minimal state. This is the first stage of the development of public management. Government provision was seen, at best, as a necessary evil. The majority of public services were located in the charitable sector, or through private provision (Owen 1965). Indeed, in the US, such a model was elevated almost to the status of a social principle, as de Tocqueville (1971) noted at the time (see also Salamon 1987; Moulton and Anheier 2000). However, the minimal state or the state as a necessary evil is not the same thing as no state whatsoever. It was in these early days of public provision that the basic principles of public administration were laid out. Wilson (1887) famously distinguished between the constitutional structure of government and the administration of its roles.

The second stage of public management, commencing in the early twentieth century, is best characterized as that of unequal partnership between government and the charitable and private sectors. In part, this was a function of a larger ideological shift, from the traditional conservatism of the nineteenth century

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Public Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 355

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.