Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools: A Reader

By Maggie Smith | Go to book overview

21

The role of research in supporting teaching and learning

Margaret Roberts


Introduction

During the past decade, the role of educational research in the UK has been the subject of considerable debate. Discussion has centred on issues such as: priorities for educational research; how 'user groups' of research should be involved; the extent to which research should lead to 'applied outcomes'; and the 'relevance' of research (Rudduck and McIntyre 1998). Underpinning this debate is the notion accepted by most educational researchers that there should be some sort of connection between educational research on the one hand and the policy and practice of education on the other. How this connection is conceptualised varies, however, particularly in relation to teaching. Hargreaves has argued that teaching should be a 'research-based' profession and that it should be 'evidence-based' (Hargreaves 1998). These phrases suggest a direct relationship between applied research and application in the classroom. Hannon (1998), however, sees the role of research somewhat differently when he states, 'Teachers do not use research as a cookbook but as a resource in constructing their view of what is worth aiming for and likely ways to get it' (p. 151).

The general debate about educational research has raised questions that are important for geographical education. What is worth researching? Can research provide evidence for a basis for teaching geography? How can it help teachers to construct their views of what is worth aiming for? These questions provide a context for this chapter which sets out to explore the role of research in supporting the teaching and learning of Geography in schools. The approach I have adopted is different from others who have written about geography education research. Other approaches have given emphasis to what has been researched and how. Foskett and Marsden (1999) have compiled a useful bibliography, categorising what has been written on geographical and environmental education into themes. Williams (1996) and Slater (1996) were both concerned with how research into geographical education has been carried out and have illustrated different 'approaches', 'methods' and 'ideologies' with examples. The starting point for these writers was the research itself.

I have approached the question about the role of research in supporting teaching and learning from the other end of the research/practice debate. I want to focus

-283-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools: A Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 331

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.