Rhode Island Politics and Government

By Maureen Moakley; Elmer Cornwell | Go to book overview

Series Preface
JOHN KINCAID

The purpose of this series is to provide informative and interesting books on the politics and governments of the fifty American states, books that are of value not only to students of government but also to general citizens who want greater insight into the past and present civic life of their own state and of other states in the federal union. The role of the states in governing America is among the least well known of all the 87,504 governments in the United States. The national media focus attention on the federal government in Washington dc, and local media focus attention on local government. Meanwhile, except when there is a scandal or a proposed tax increase, the workings of state government remain something of a mystery to many citizens—out of sight, out of mind.

In many respects, however, the states have been and continue to be the most important governments in the American political system. They are the main building blocks and chief organizing governments of the whole system. The states are the constituent governments of the federal union, and it is through the states that citizens gain representation in the federal government. The federal government is one of limited, delegated powers; all other powers are possessed by the states and their citizens. At the same time, the states are the empowering governments for the nation's 87,453 local governments— counties, municipalities, townships, school districts, and special districts. As such, states provide one of the most essential and ancient elements of freedom and democracy: the right of local self-government.

Although for many citizens the most visible aspects of state government are state universities (some of which are the most prestigious in the world), and state highway patrol officers with their radar guns and handy ticket books, state governments provide nearly all domestic public services. Whether elements of those services are enacted or partly funded by the

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Rhode Island Politics and Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Series Preface xi
  • Authors' Preface xiii
  • Rhode Island Politics and Government *
  • Chapter One - Rhode Island in Transition 1
  • Chapter Two - Political Culture in the Ocean State 19
  • Chapter Three - Rhode Island and the Federal System 36
  • Chapter Four - The Constitution 50
  • Chapter Five - The General Assembly 65
  • Chapter Six - The Executive and the Administration 84
  • Chapter Seven - The Courts 108
  • Chapter Eight - Political Parties 125
  • Chapter Nine - Interest and Group Representation 144
  • Chapter Ten - Budget Politics and Policy 163
  • Chapter Eleven - The Politics of Education 178
  • Chapter Twelve - Local Government 196
  • Epilogue 213
  • General Resources 219
  • Notes 225
  • Index 241
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