On Broadway: Art and Commerce on the Great White Way

By Steven Adler | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book, like Broadway itself, reflects the participation of a wide cross section of people, all of whom were extremely supportive of this project and generous with their time and insight.

Several interviewees are old friends and colleagues who assisted me not only in seeing the terrain with greater acuity but also in networking, a critical task. Many of those whom I met for the first time while researching this book were extraordinarily helpful, too, putting me in touch with their colleagues and friends, and so the circle quickly grew.

Three people, themselves subjects, deserve special gratitude. Frank Rich, the dean of modern Broadway theatre criticism, was invaluable not only in framing the critical issues but also in providing the necessary introduction to so many of the practitioners with whom I spoke. Alan Levey of Disney, a friend and colleague for years, patiently explained much and consistently pointed me in the right direction. Seth Gelblum, attorney extraordinaire, gave me a one-man tutorial in producing and arranged several interviews. Tom Aberger, Danny Burstein, Judith Dolan, Terrence Dwyer, Rebecca Luker, Des McAnuff, William Parry, Jim Pentecost, Daryl Roth, Jim Sullivan, and Dianne Trulock, gracious subjects all, provided essential introductions to so many others.

My good pals Barbara Pitts and John Vivian opened several doors that would have remained shut without their intercession. Roy Somlyo, past president of the American Theatre Wing, generously provided me with a comprehensive set of videotapes that handsomely chronicle the various aspects of working in the professional theatre. Karita Burbank of Disney Theatrical, Don Hill at Actors' Equity Association, Aaron Levin at Disney Theatrical, Allison Matera at Manhattan Theatre Club, Gloria McCormick at the American Federation of Musicians Local 802, Sandra Nance at Theatre Communications Group, Ted Pappas at the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers, Jeremy Simon at the National Arts Journalism Program at Columbia University, Yseult Taylor at the International Society for the Performing Arts, Amy Tripodi at La Jolla Playhouse, and Zenovia Varelis at the League of American Theatres and Producers

-xi-

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On Broadway: Art and Commerce on the Great White Way
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - Reconciliation Ecology 1
  • 2 - The Producers 30
  • 3 - Broadway, Inc 67
  • 4 - When Worlds Collide 102
  • 5 - The Money Song 137
  • 6 - Page to Stage 166
  • 7 - The Nature of the Beast 201
  • Notes 231
  • Bibliography 237
  • Index 243
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