On Broadway: Art and Commerce on the Great White Way

By Steven Adler | Go to book overview

Notes

1. The Terrain
1
A complete list of interviews conducted by the author may be found in the bibliography. To avoid tedious note citations throughout the text, author-subject interviews are not documented in the notes section.
2
Karen Hauser and Catherine Lanier, Broadway's Economic Contribution to New York City, 2000 — 2001 Season (New York: League of American Theatres and Producers, and Alliance for the Arts, 2002), 6.
3
Regional theatre is a term largely avoided by the sixty-plus professional notfor -profit theatres that are members of the League of Resident Theatres. Regional was banished from the acronym because it suggested that these theatres exist in the geographic and cultural hinterlands and New York City alone is the pulsing heart of theatrical exploration.
4
The workshop production, which A Chorus Line birthed, allowed producers to better afford the initial stage in the genesis of a show. It became a staple of Broadway and continues as an important means of developing new work. Some producers use this method in place of the actors-by-the-piano backers audition to raise cash, and spend a significant amount of seed money to conjure some sense of the glories to come in a larger production. Other producers employ the workshop as a low-cost, controlled environment in which to try out the work for the artists.
5
John Willis, Theatre World, 1975 — 76 (New York: Crown Publishers, 1977), 6.
6
Karen Hauser, Who Goes to Broadway? The Demographics of the Audience, 2000–2001 Season (New York: League of American Theatres and Producers), 11.
7
National Arts Journalism Program, Wonderful Town: The Future of the Theater in New York (New York: National Arts Journalism Program, Columbia University, 2002), 19.
8
Hauser, Who Goes to Broadway?, 44.
9
Approximately is used because theatre buildings occasionally go out of business as theatres. Others have been demolished, and new ones have been built, so that a constant number is difficult to pinpoint.
10
Reputedly one of the most expensive Broadway shows to date was The Lion King. Disney Theatrical staff decline to give specific figures for the total costs of their shows, but educated guesses put the figure at a minimum of twenty million dollars.

-231-

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On Broadway: Art and Commerce on the Great White Way
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - Reconciliation Ecology 1
  • 2 - The Producers 30
  • 3 - Broadway, Inc 67
  • 4 - When Worlds Collide 102
  • 5 - The Money Song 137
  • 6 - Page to Stage 166
  • 7 - The Nature of the Beast 201
  • Notes 231
  • Bibliography 237
  • Index 243
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